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David Ransom

Mr. David Ransom

Mr. David Ransom
Lecturer
Visual Arts

biography

David Ransom’s interest in Fine Art centers on the human figure and follows the long and rich tradition of classical Academic training inspired by the 19th Century French Academy and Drawing Ateliers. In his pursuit of the Greco-Roman tradition of Art, David found his way from the Lower Rio Grande Valley where he received his Bachelor’s of Fine Arts from the University of Texas at Pan American to New York City where he was accepted into the Graduate School of Figurative Art at the Prestigious New York Academy of Art and graduated cum laude with a Master’s of Fine Arts in 2005. During his course of study David was awarded a scholarship for his self-portrait and created a master copy of Diego Velazquez’s painting of Juan de Pareja at the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art. Under the instruction of such notables as Ted Schmidt and Steven Assael, David studied Anatomy and Classical Painting Techniques. In the summer of 2004 David met the world renowned Kitsch Painter Odd Nerdrum and accepted a personal invitation to travel to Norway for a summer residence in 2005. David Ransom returned to Texas later that year living and exhibiting in Austin where he was represented by the El Taller Gallery before joining The University of Texas Brownsville as an adjunct faculty member in the Visual Arts Dept. in 2008.

TEACHING PHILOSOPHY: During the Renaissance and Baroque periods the term “Aemulatio” was often used. This term translates as “modeling oneself on great predecessors”. Aemulatio basically describes my philosophy on teaching and within the Pantheon of Art there is no shortage of great predecessors. I am strongly influenced by the ideology and structure of the Baroque academies and later 19th century academies and their usefulness as a foundation for teaching. It is a foundation with a hierarchical structure in which Drawing is the basis for all art-making. This hierarchy encompasses the elements of design, principles of perspective, anatomy, philosophy, science, geometry, and metaphysics. Art is a knowledge-based pursuit which impacts society. There is responsibility in image-making. Critical thinking and decision making are two vital components in the creative process. I believe this philosophy will facilitate the needs of the students and provide them perceptually and conceptually allowing them to develop their own form sense. It also equips students in observation and comprehension, not only investigating the mechanics of seeing but demonstrating a “way of seeing” that lends itself to a profound use of the concept of vision. In our own pluralistic age of post-modernity the thought of academic training may seem antiquated and antithetical to the notion of “progressive” values. However, Aemulatio has historically been the springboard for originality, innovation, and progressive ideas. From DaVinci to Rembrandt, Monet to Picasso, Dali to Lucien Freud, Aemulatio has been the impetus for all these innovators as well as countless others in every discipline.

Degrees:

M.F.A. 2005 Painting New York Academy of Art
B.F.A. 2001 Painting University of Texas Pan American

CV/VITAE: Ransom Vitae

Classes Taught:

Art Appreciation
Two Dimensional Design
Drawing I
Drawing II
Advanced Drawing

Joined UTB:

2008

Area of Specialty and REsponsibility:

Drawing

Previous Experience:

Refer to Curriculum Vitae

Office Hours - spring 2012

T.B.A.
Office: ITECC D120D
Phone: (956) 882-4254
Fax: (956) 882-8247
David.Ransom@utb.edu

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