One West University Boulevard, Brownsville, Texas 78520 | 956-882-8200

Frequently Asked Questions

How can I join L.A.M.P.?
You can join L.A.M.P. by visiting the online application form or call us at (956) 882-7152 or email us at sergio.martinez3@utb.edu. L.A.M.P. has 300 seats available. Selections are based on a first-come, first-served basis.

What is mentoring?
Mentoring – from the Greek word meaning enduring – is defined as a sustained relationship between a youth and an adult. Through continued involvement, the adult offers support, guidance, and assistance as the younger person goes through a difficult period, faces new challenges, or works to correct earlier problems. In particular, where parents are either unavailable or unable to provide responsible guidance for their children, mentors can play a critical role.

The two types of mentoring are natural mentoring and planned mentoring. Natural mentoring occurs through friendship, collegiality, teaching, coaching, and counseling. Planned mentoring occurs through structured programs in which mentors and participants are selected and matched through formal processes.

How does the mentor/mentee relationship work?
L.A.M.P. mentors provide new students with information about campus and commmunity resources, activities, organizations, important dates, and deadlines. Peer mentors help new students learn how to succeed in their college careers while providing support and encouragement.  Mentors are not expected to be counselors or tutors. Primary responsibility for participation lies with the mentee. Your mentor will act as a role model, guide, and friend and answer any questions you may be to shy to ask a counselor or advisor. Mentors are students, usually completing their first two years of college, who do academically well and can teach their mentees the skills to succeed at UTB.

How are mentors and mentees paired together?
The primary criterion for matching mentors and mentees is academic major; if an identical mojor is not available, the the mentor and mentee will be matched by college or school.  Once matched, participants are notified either by mail or e-mail.

How much contact is required?
L.A.M.P. requires students meet with mentees for at least 30 minutes each week for the first semester of college.  Contact can be by telephone, e-mail or in person. Matched participants may adjust to fit each other's needs.

Is this a tutoring program?
While mentors can provide you with academic advice, the mentorship program is not a tutoring program. Students should feel free to ask mentors about their experiences with classes and professors, and for tips on studying, finals, and class scheduling. However, mentors are not trained as academic tutors. They can, however, direct students to resources that can help you with specific homework questions, such as the Learning Assistance Center or private tutoring.

Can I withdraw from L.A.M.P. if I decide it is not right for me? 
The L.A.M.P. staff strongly encourages students to remain involved with mentorship once they are accepted as mentees. However, students who are not able to remain active participants will need to notify the L.A.M.P. office as soon as possible. It is disruptive to the entire group if mentees decide to drop out once the school year has started or leave without notification.

What does the research say about the benefits of mentoring?
Arlene Mark of New York City's I Have a Dream program observed, "We will only know who can be helped or what is the right kind of mentoring, when we try it." (Flaxman and Ascher 1992).

Yet while research on the effects of mentoring is scarce, some studies and program evaluations do support positive claims (Flaxman 1992).

In an evaluation of Project R.A.I.S.E., a Baltimore-based mentoring project, McPartland and Nettles (1991) found mentoring had positive affects on school attendance and grades in English but not on promotion rates or standardized test scores. They concluded that positive effects are much more likely when one-on-one mentoring has been strongly implemented.

Another evaluation (Cave and Quint 1990) found participants in various mentoring programs had higher levels of college enrollment and higher educational aspirations than nonparticipants receiving comparable amounts of education and job-related services.

Frequently Asked Questions

How can I join L.A.M.P.?
You can join L.A.M.P. by visiting the online application form or call us at (956) 882-7152 or email us at
sergio.martinez3@utb.edu. L.A.M.P. has 300 seats available. Selections are based on a first-come, first-served basis.

What is mentoring?
Mentoring  from the Greek word meaning enduring  is defined as a sustained relationship between a youth and an adult. Through continued involvement, the adult offers support, guidance, and assistance as the younger person goes through a difficult period, faces new challenges, or works to correct earlier problems. In particular, where parents are either unavailable or unable to provide responsible guidance for their children, mentors can play a critical role.

The two types of mentoring are natural mentoring and planned mentoring. Natural mentoring occurs through friendship, collegiality, teaching, coaching, and counseling. Planned mentoring occurs through structured programs in which mentors and participants are selected and matched through formal processes.

How does the mentor/mentee relationship work?
L.A.M.P. mentors provide new students with information about campus and commmunity resources, activities, organizations, important dates, and deadlines. Peer mentors help new students learn how to succeed in their college careers while providing support and encouragement.  Mentors are not expected to be counselors or tutors. Primary responsibility for participation lies with the mentee. Your mentor will act as a role model, guide, and friend and answer any questions you may be to shy to ask a counselor or advisor. Mentors are students, usually completing their first two years of college, who do academically well and can teach their mentees the skills to succeed at UTB/TSC.

How are mentors and mentees paired together?
The primary criterion for matching mentors and mentees is academic major; if an identical mojor is not available, the the mentor and mentee will be matched by college or school.  Once matched, participants are notified either by mail or e-mail.

How much contact is required?
L.A.M.P. requires students meet with mentees for at least 30 minutes each week for the first semester of college.  Contact can be by telephone, e-mail or in person. Matched participants may adjust to fit each other's needs.

Is this a tutoring program?
While mentors can provide you with academic advice, the mentorship program is not a tutoring program. Students should feel free to ask mentors about their experiences with classes and professors, and for tips on studying, finals, and class scheduling. However, mentors are not trained as academic tutors. They can, however, direct students to resources that can help you with specific homework questions, such as the Learning Assistance Center or private tutoring.

Can I withdraw from L.A.M.P. if I decide it is not right for me? 
The L.A.M.P. staff strongly encourages students to remain involved with mentorship once they are accepted as mentees. However, students who are not able to remain active participants will need to notify the L.A.M.P. office as soon as possible. It is disruptive to the entire group if mentees decide to drop out once the school year has started or leave without notification.

What does the research say about the benefits of mentoring?
Arlene Mark of New York City's I Have a Dream program observed, "We will only know who can be helped or what is the right kind of mentoring, when we try it." (Flaxman and Ascher 1992).

Yet while research on the effects of mentoring is scarce, some studies and program evaluations do support positive claims (Flaxman 1992).

In an evaluation of Project R.A.I.S.E., a Baltimore-based mentoring project, McPartland and Nettles (1991) found mentoring had positive affects on school attendance and grades in English but not on promotion rates or standardized test scores. They concluded that positive effects are much more likely when one-on-one mentoring has been strongly implemented.

Another evaluation (Cave and Quint 1990) found participants in various mentoring programs had higher levels of college enrollment and higher educational aspirations than nonparticipants receiving comparable amounts of education and job-related services.

For comments and questions, please contact the Webmaster.