One West University Boulevard, Brownsville, Texas 78520 | 956-882-8200

College of Liberal Arts

 

Dr. Javier Martinez, Dean
Mary Rose Cardenas Hall South 246
882-8843
javier.a.martinez@utb.edu
 
      The College of Liberal Arts offers over a dozen graduate degrees including Master of Arts degrees in English, History, Psychology, Spanish, Spanish Translation and Interpreting, and a Master of Music in Music Education, and Master of Public Policy and Management, and Graduate Certificates in Spanish Translation Studies, History, and Court Interpreting.
 
      These graduate programs serve not only to edify students’ knowledge in the respective areas of study but to enhance students’ critical thinking, research, and communicative skills, and to prepare graduates for rewarding careers and career advancement. Furthermore, our graduate students work closely with dedicated and caring faculty many of whom are nationally and internationally recognized experts in their fields.

Graduate Programs
M.A. in Psychology
M.A. in English
Master of Public Policy and Management
M.A. in History
M.M. in Music Education
M.A. in Spanish
M.A. in Spanish Translation and Interpreting
M.A. in Interdisciplinary Studies
Graduate Certificate in Spanish Translation
Graduate Certificate in History
Graduate Certificate in Court Interpreting

Behavioral Sciences
Dr. Diamantina G. Freeberg
Mary Rose Cardenas Hall South #294
882-8869
diamond.freeberg@utb.edu
 
Graduate Faculty
Diamantina Freeberg, Professor
Mark Horowitz, Assistant Professor
Matthew C. Johnson, Associate Professor
Sherry McCullough, Associate Professor
Leslie Meyer, Assistant Professor
Scott A. Reid, Associate Professor
Luis Rodriguez-Abad,Professor
William Yaworsky, Assistant Professor
Antonio N. Zavaleta, Professor
 
Master of Arts in Psychology
36-Hour Thesis or Non-thesis Program
The Master of Arts degree in Psychology, offered by the College of Liberal Arts through the Behavioral Sciences Department directs students in developing a strong foundation in general psychology. The M.A. degree requires a total of 36 semester hours of graduate credit. The program offers a thesis or non-thesis degree option and guides students in building a working knowledge of psychological theory and research that can be applied in a variety of settings.
The M.A. in Psychology prepares graduates to work in basic and applied research, enhance their current employment, and prepare for doctoral-level programs in psychology. This is a research oriented psychology program and neither provides training in clinical or counseling psychology nor does it lead to licensure, such as LPA or LPC . For course descriptions and other information related to graduate studies, visit our website at www.utb.edu/graduatestudies.
Admission Requirements
Evidence of academic achievement and potential for advanced study and research is required for graduate admission. Specific criteria for Unconditional Admission for master’s degree seeking students in psychology are:
o    Bachelor’s degree in Psychology or other discipline with undergraduate coursework in Statistics, Research Methods, Introduction or Psychology
o    3.0 GPA
o    12 undergraduate upper-division hours in Psychology including PSYC 2317 and PSYC 3301 (Statistics and Research Methods)
o    GRE Verbal score of 146 (400 if taken prior to August 2011)
o    GRE Quantitative score of 140 (400 if taken prior to August 2011)
o    GRE Analytical score of 4.0
o    A personal statement of 600 words
o    2 letters of recommendation (at least 1 from a faculty)
 
Applicants with an undergraduate GPA below 3.0 but of at least 2.5 and/or GRE scores lower than those specified will be considered on a conditional basis.
A complete application packet, including a graduate admission application and all supporting documents required by the department, must be submitted by June 1st for Fall acceptance and Dec. 1 for spring acceptance.
Notification of decisions on a graduate admission is made by the Office of Graduate Studies based on the admission criteria and recommendation of the academic department. Information related to application procedures and deadlines is available through the Office of Graduate Studies.
 
36 Hour Thesis or Non Thesis Program
Each student in the M.A. degree program will be assigned a Faculty advisor. Together the student and the advisor will choose courses in Psychology. A formal “Program of Study” as described in the Graduate Catalog will be prepared and submitted for approval by the Office of Graduate Studies.
 
Thesis Option
Required Courses
PSYC 6301 Advanced General Psychology
PSYC 6302 Research Methods
PSYC 6303 Inferential Statistics
PSYC 6304 Multivariate Statistics
PSYC 6318 Learning, Memory, and Cognition
PSYC 6333 Theories of Personality
 
Thesis
As part of their graduate program, students may choose the option of writing a thesis, for which they will receive six hours of graduate credit. Those who take this option must select a thesis committee, composed of a committee chairperson and two other members of the graduate faculty, to approve the topic and to assist in the preparation of the thesis. Students must pass an oral defense of the completed thesis. Students selecting this option will register for PSYC 7300 and PSYC 7301. It is strongly recommended that students who seek to pursue a doctoral degree complete the thesis option.
 
Non-thesis Option
Required Courses
PSYC 6301 Advanced General Psychology
PSYC 6302 Research Methods
PSYC 6303 Inferential Statistics
PSYC 6304 Multivariate Statistics
PSYC 6318 Learning, Memory, and Cognition
PSYC 6333 Theories of Personality
PSYC 6390 Psychology Research Internship
Psychology 6303 Inferential Statistics and Psychology 6304 Multivariate Statistics are required and must be completed during the first year of graduate studies. In accordance with university policy, graduate credit from another university will be accepted from transfer students.
 
Elective Courses
PSYC 6305 Social Psychology
PSYC 6306 Group Dynamics
PSYC 6307 Developmental Psychology: Adolescence
PSYC 6308 Industrial and Organizational Psychology
PSYC 6310 Teaching in Behavioral Sciences
PSYC 6313 Abnormal Psychology
PSYC 6321 Contemporary Topics in Psychology
 
Comprehensive Examination
Each candidate for the non-thesis Master of Arts in Psychology degree must pass a comprehensive written examination prepared by the graduate faculty and administered by the faculty in the Behavioral Sciences Department.

Financial Aid/Scholarship/Graduate Assistantship
The award of financial aid, scholarships, and graduate assistantships is based on need, academic achievement, and availability. For more information, please inquire at the Office of Financial Aid, The Office of Graduate Studies, and the Behavioral Sciences Department.

Graduate Course Descriptions
Psychology
PSYC     6301     Advanced General Psychology
this course traces the historical and philosophical basis for the development of psychology as a Science. Major theoretical viewpoints from 1879 to the present will be explored. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PSYC     6302     Research Methods
This course provides advanced training in research design with an emphasis in quantitative data analysis.  Empirical examples in psychology are used to illustrate various research designs and statistical methods to ensure that students become intelligent producers and consumers of research.  Lec 3, Cr 3  Prerequisite: PSYC 2317 or comparable undergraduate statistics course, PSYC 3301 or comparable undergraduate research course, Admission to graduate program. 
 
PSYC 6303 Inferential Statistics
This course provides an overview of statistical methods commonly used in psychological science. Topics include univariate data analysis and interpretation in single factor, factorial, repeated measures, mixed, and covariate designs; statistical power and measures of effect size; nonparametric statistics; and statistical computer applications such as SPSS. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PSYC 6304 Multivariate Statistics
This course explores common statistic techniques involving multiple variables.  The course expands upon the knowledge gained in the inferential statistics course and focuses on the concepts and techniques that are commonly used in academic and applied research. Students will learn how to utilize the various techniques using the common statistical programs SPSS and AMOS. Topics include correlation, regression, multiple regression, factor analysis, MANOVA, path modeling and structural equations modeling. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PSYC 6305 Social Psychology
This course examines a diversity of social psychological theories and models.  Theoretical constructs in social psychology are evaluated across varied paradigms, theories and research.  Attention is paid to alternative conceptualizations of theories, including the nature of social reality and subsequent reality construction processes through analysis of primary sources by the field’s exemplars.  Lec 3, Cr
 
PSYC 6306 Group Dynamics
This course focuses on group theory, research and process. The objective of this course is to develop knowledge, skills and experiences in how groups function and the dynamics of human interaction in a group setting. Topics include intergroup relations, group decision-making, group problem-solving, teamwork, leadership, collective behavior, and conflict. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PSYC     6307     Adolescent Psychology
This course will provide an overview of selected developmental theories and issues in adolescent psychology beginning with the early Greeks and concluding with modern feminists and multicultural theories.  Contemporary topics of adolescents in society will also be addressed. Lec. 3, Cr.  Prerequisite: Admission to graduate program.
 
PSYC 6308 Industrial and Organizational Psychology
This course focuses on the major topics in Industrial-Organizational (I/O) psychology such as:  selection, training, motivation, organizational change, organizational development, leadership, testing and personnel decisions.  Students will explore a variety of workplace issues and behaviors from the perspective of an I/O psychologist.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PSYC     6310     Teaching in Behavioral Sciences
Psychology 6310 presents students with sound educational practices for teaching behavioral science courses and prepares them for teaching in post-secondary settings.
 
PSYC     6313     Abnormal Psychology
Analysis, etiology, and incidence of neurosis and psychosis, mental hygiene problems, and adjustive behavior. A research project and supporting specialized readings will be emphasized. Students may not receive credit for both PSYC 4313 and PSYC 5313. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PSYC     6318     Learning, Memory and Cognition
This course approaches learning from a modern cognitive perspective. Emphasis is placed on higher-order cognitive processes such as knowledge representation, conceptual structure, concept learning, memory processes, and memory distortion. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PSYC 6333 Theories of Personality
A study of the development, structure, and assessment of personality with a consideration of the major theoretical attempts to account for the psychological nature and the behavior of man. A research project and supporting specialized readings will be emphasized. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PSYC  6390  Psychology Research Internship
Supervision of an approved internships that focuses on basic and/or applied research.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PSYC  7300  Thesis
Independent thesis research and writing.  Prerequisite: PSYC 6301, PSYC 6302, PSYC 6303 and PSYC 6304.
 
PSYC  7301  Thesis
Independent thesis research and writing.  Prerequisite: PSYC 6301, PSYC 6302, PSYC 6303 and PSYC 6304.
 
English
Dr. Eduardo Del Rio, Chair
Mary Rose Cardenas Hall South 220
882-7653
eduardo.delrio@utb.edu

Graduate Faculty
Charles Dameron, Professor
Eduardo R. del Rio, Associate Professor
Diana Dominguez, Associate Professor
Sheila Dooley, Assistant Professor
James Frost, Associate Professor
Farhat Iftekharuddin, Professor
Noor Islam, Associate Professor
Javier A. Martinez, Associate Professor
Wayne Moore, Professor
Teresa Murden, Associate Professor
John Newman Associate Professor
Lyon Rathbun, Associate Professor
Mimosa Stephenson, Professor
Yong-Kang Wei, Associate Professor
 
Master of Arts (M.A.) - English
The Master of Arts degree in English, offered by the College of Liberal Arts through the Department of English guides students in the study of language, composition, and literature. Educational objectives include refining research, bibliographic, and composition skills; studying the nature and uses of language; acquiring theoretical perspectives on the writing process; studying selected authors in depth; and examining literary periods, styles, or movements in detail. A master’s degree in English prepares students for more advanced study in English, for teaching English at the secondary or college level, and for many professions that require proficiency in written communication. This degree gives students the option of a thesis or Non-Thesis program.  For more information, visit utb.edu/graduatestudies.
 
36-Hour Thesis or Non-Thesis Program
The Master of Arts degree without a thesis consists of 36 hours; the Master of Arts degree with thesis consists of 30 hours of coursework with six additional hours awarded for the thesis.  All students are required to take English 6300 Introduction to Graduate Studies within their first year of coursework and to meet the following breadth requirement during their Programs of Study:  at least one course each in literature, rhetoric/composition, and linguistics.
 
Admission Requirements
Evidence of academic achievement and potential for advanced study and research is required for graduate admission.  Specific criteria for Unconditional Admission for Master’s degree seeking students in English are:
    Undergraduate GPA of 3.0
    GRE Verbal score of 153 (500 if taken prior to August 2011)
    GRE Analytical score of 4.0
    A 3.0 GPA in 12 hrs of upper division English courses.
Applicants with an undergraduate GPA of at least 2.5 and/or GRE scores lower than those specified will be considered for admission on a conditional basis.
A complete application packet, including a graduate admission application and all supporting documents required by the department, must be submitted by
June 1st – Fall;  November 1st – Spring; April 1st – Summer.
 
Notification of decisions on graduate admission is made by the Office of Graduate Studies based on the admission criteria and recommendation of the academic department.  Information related to application procedures and deadlines is available at the Office of Graduate Studies.
 
Students may pursue an emphasis in literature, rhetoric/composition, or linguistics by following the recommended course options described below:
 
M.A. in English with an Emphasis in Literature
o    ENGL 6300 (3 hrs)
o    1 course in rhetoric or composition (3 hrs)
o    1 course in linguistics (3 hrs)
o    2 courses in English Literature, one of which should be in a pre-19th century writer or period (6 hrs)
o    2 courses in American Literature, one of which should be in a pre-20th century writer or period (6 hrs)
AND
o    5 graduate elective courses (15 hours)
OR
o    Thesis (6 hrs)
o    3 graduate elective courses (9 hrs)
M.A. in English with an Emphasis in Rhetoric and Composition
o    ENGL 6300 (3hrs)
o    1 course in literature (3 hrs)
o    1 course in linguistics (3 hrs)
o    ENGL 6320 (3 hrs) Forms of Academic Writing
o    ENGL 6321 (3 hrs) Rhetorical Theory
o    ENGL 6322 (3 hrs) Composition Theory and Practice
o    ENGL 6323 (3 hrs) Professional Writing
o    2 Topics courses (6 hrs) selected from ENGL 6396 Special Topics in Rhetoric and/or ENGL 6399 Special Topics in the Composing Process – Courses may be repeated under different topics AND
o    3 graduate elective courses (9 hrs)
OR
o    Thesis (6 hrs)
o    1 graduate elective course (3 hrs)
M.A. in English with an Emphasis in Linguistics
o    ENGL 6300 (3hrs)
o    1 course in literature (3 hrs)
o    1 course in rhetoric or composition (3 hrs)
o    ENGL 6307 (3 hrs) Varieties of Present-Day English
o    ENGL 6308 (3 hrs) History of the English Language
o    2 instances of ENGL 6397 (6 hrs) Special Topics in Linguistics – Course must be repeated under different topics
 AND
o    5 graduate elective courses (15 hrs)
OR
o    Thesis (6 hrs)
o    3 graduate elective courses (9 hrs)
 
With proper planning and with the approval of their graduate committees, students may take six of the 30 required hours in a field that is outside of English but that is directly relevant to the students’ program of study.  In accordance with university policy, graduate credit from another university will be accepted from transfer students.
 
Thesis
As part of their graduate program in English, students may choose the option of writing a thesis, for which they will receive six hours of graduate credit. Those who take this option must select a thesis committee, composed of a committee chairperson and two other members of the graduate English faculty, to approve the topic and to assist in the preparation of the thesis. (See thesis-Non-Thesis option under “Academic Information”.) Students must pass an oral defense of the completed thesis.
 
Comprehensive Examination
Each candidate for the Non-Thesis Master of Arts degree in English must pass a comprehensive written examination prepared and administered by the English graduate faculty and administered by the Office of Graduate Studies.
 
Graduate Courses Descriptions
English
ENGL    6300     Introduction to Graduate Studies
Principles and procedures in scholarly research. Introduction to the problems, techniques, and tools of graduate-level study and research in English. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
ENGL    6301     Shakespeare
A study of the comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances of Shakespeare, emphasizing wide reading of the playwright. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
ENGL    6302     Topics in Medieval Literature
This graduate seminar will cover selected works from about 700 to 1490 CE, primarily in Britain.  These works will be discussed for their literary merit as well as their historical significance, which includes issues of gender, class, and religious concerns.  Course may be repeated once for credit with advisor approval when topic varies.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
ENGL    6303     The Bible as Literature
A study of the Bible as literature, emphasizing the genres and literary techniques employed by the writers. The course treats the Bible as a major source for English and American literature. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
ENGL 6304 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama
This graduate seminar will critically analyze selected plays written in England during the reigns of Elizabeth I and James I, exclusive of William Shakespeare. Lec 3, Cr 3

ENGL    6305     The Romantic Period
A study of early 19th-century English romantic writers with emphasis on the poets Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, and Byron. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
ENGL    6307     Varieties of Present-day English
This graduate seminar explores the features of the diverse varieties of Present-day English, focusing on the semantic, lexical and grammatical patterns which characterize Englishes such as those of the British Isles, the Americas, Africa, Australasia, and Southeast Asia.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
ENGL    6308     History of the English Language
A history of the English language from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
ENGL    6310     Topics in 20th Century Poetry
A study of major English and American poets of the 20th century. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
ENGL    6312     Milton
A study of the major poems and selected prose of John Milton. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
ENGL    6320     Forms of Academic Writing
This graduate seminar will enable graduate students to become independent and skilled writers in their disciplines through assignments that focus on the varieties of academic written discourse, grammar and style, terminology, critical reading skills, and conventions governing plagiarism and citation of sources. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
ENGL    6321     Rhetorical Theory
This course focuses on major historical and theoretical developments in the study of rhetoric and the application of rhetorical concepts in the analysis of discourse. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
ENGL    6322    Applications of Composition Theory
A survey of best practices in current composition theory. Participants review and practice strategies for teaching composition in an intensive workshop setting. The course supports the Sabal Palms Writing Project.  Prerequisites: Eligibility for the course is established by Sabal Palms Writing Project.  Lec 4, Cr 3
 
ENGL 6323 Professional Writing
This course will enable students to gain insights into professional writing and develop communication skills in the workplace environment. The course is designed as an intensive workshop focused on creating technical documents for clients, consumers, and the general public. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
ENGL    6341     Literary Criticism
Selected works in literary criticism. Important modern and traditional critical positions and their application to literature. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
ENGL    6362     The Victorian Period
A study of the late 19th-century literature in England. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
ENGL    6363     20th-Century English Novel
A study of the major novelists of England in the 20th century. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
ENGL    6364     Restoration and 18th-Century British Literature
This course explores selected Restoration and 18th century British writers and their works, themes, and literary developments, including fiction, poetry, drama and non-fiction.  Prerequisite: Graduate student in good standing.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
ENGL    6370     Topics in Early American Literature
This graduate seminar will cover selected literary and historical texts from the Early American Period (approximately 1620-1830), with the subject matter varying depending on instructor and semester.  Course may be repeated once for credit with advisor approval when topic varies.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
ENGL    6371     20th-Century American Novel
A study of the major novelists in the United States in the 20th century. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
ENGL    6372     Hawthorne and Melville
A study of the major novels and short stories of Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville. Lec 3, Cr 3

ENGL    6373     Topics in Nineteenth Century American Literature
This course explores different approaches to and topics in nineteenth-century American literature, exclusive of Hawthorne and Melville.  Subject matter varies depending on instructor and semester but may include such topics as American Revolution, Transcendentalism, Realism, Frontier Humor, Regionalism and Naturalism, as they are expressed in the work of major and minor authors of the time, including women and minority writers.  May be repeated for credit with permission as topics vary. Lec 3, Cr 3

ENGL    6374     19th Century American Women Writers
This graduate seminar will cover selected novels, short stories, essays, and poetry written by American women during the 19th century.  These works will be discussed not only for their literary merit but for their historical significance and their relevance to gender concerns.  Lec 3, Cr 3

ENGL 6396 Special Topics in Rhetoric
This course covers topics in  rhetorical theory focusing on contemporary and historical trends from the perspectives of rhetoric as an analytical tool for discourse, rhetoric as a guide for production of discourse, and the pedagogy of teaching rhetoric.  Course examines in greater detail specific perspectives in rhetoric introduced in the ENGL 6321 Rhetorical Theory course.  Course may be repeated once as topic varies.  Lec 3, Cr 3

ENGL 6397 Special Topics in Linguistics
This course will cover topics in linguistics, which could include sub-disciplines of the field (e.g. syntax), linguistic methodology (e.x. linguistic typology), or particular language areas (e.x. Spanish and English contact in the Rio Grande Valley). The course may be repeated once as topics vary. Lec 3, Cr 3

ENGL    6398     Special Topics in Literature
This course will cover topics in literature, including such possibilities as single authors or works, or a critical application. The course may be repeated once as topics vary. Lec 3, Cr 3

ENGL    6399     Special Topics in the Composing Process
This course will cover topics in the composing process, including such possibilities as heuristic methods, analysis of style, or the works of a central figure in the discipline. The course may be repeated once as topics vary. Lec 3, Cr 3

ENGL    7300     Thesis
Pass/Fail Grade. Prerequisite: Approval of graduate advisor
 
ENGL    7301   Thesis
Pass/Fail Grade. Prerequisite: Approval of graduate advisor
 
Government
Dr. Guadalupe Correa-Cabrera,  Chair
Mary Rose Cardenas Hall South# 277
882-3876
Guadalupe.CorreaCabrera@utb.edu
 
Graduate Faculty
Alan Artibise, Professor
Guadalupe Correa-Cabrera, Assistant Professor
Mark Kaswan, Assistant Professor
Leland Coxe, Assistant Professor
Terence Garrett, Associate Professor
Michelle Keck, Assistant Professor
 
Masters of Public Policy and Management-(M.P.P.M.)
36-Hour Program
The Master of Public Policy and Management (MPPM) is designed to provide accessible, affordable, high-quality graduate education to prepare students or advance them in careers of leadership and management in public service.  The MPPM has a dual-purpose mission: to conduct research into pressing policy issues and then to share the findings with leaders and citizens in an effort to find viable solutions Graduates will be skilled public managers with specific expertise in one of several policy areas. Current specializations include Community and Economic Development, Health Care Policy, Criminal Justice, Environmental Policy, International and Developmental Policy, and Non Profit Management.

Admission Requirements
Evidence of academic achievement and potential for advanced study and research is required for graduate admission. Specific criteria for Unconditional Admission for Master’s degree seeking students in Public Policy are:
o    Undergraduate GPA of 3.0
o    2 Satisfactory letters of recommendation:  one of which should be academic
o    Satisfactory essay: 750 words briefly analyzing a public policy issue of their choice and discussing what insights into that issue they expect to gain in the pursuit of the MPPM.
o    Resume
Applicants with an undergraduate GPA of at least 2.5 will be considered for admission on a conditional basis.

Notification of decisions on graduate admission is made by the Office of Graduate Studies based on the admission criteria and recommendation of the academic department. Information related to application procedures and deadlines is available through the Office of Graduate Studies
A complete application packet, including a graduate admission application and all supporting documents required by the department, must be submitted by:
June 1st - Fall
November 1st - Spring
April 1st  - Summer.

Degree Requirements
Report option or Thesis option
Required Courses: 36 Hour Professional
The Master of Public Policy and Management is composed of 30-33 credit hours in core and elective (policy, management, and cognate) courses.  In addition, students must complete a thesis (6 hours) or a professional report (3 hours) to gain credit for this 36 hour program.  Graduation from this program is contingent on the completion of required core courses, elective (policy analysis/public management, related cognate area) courses, and professional report or thesis courses.

Required Courses: 18 hours
PPAM    6301     Principles of Public Administration
PPAM    6302     Public Policy and Economics
PPAM    6303     Public Budgeting, Finance
PPAM    6305     Leadership and Ethics
PPAM    6306     Public Human Resource Management
PPAM    6307     Research Methods

Electives: 
Policy analysis, Public management and cognate area elective courses: (Professional Report option, 15 elective credits required; Thesis option: 12 elective hours)

Policy Analysis and Public Management Courses:
PPAM   6304    Theories of Public Organization
PPAM    6308     International & Comparative Policy & Management
PPAM   6309     Qualitative Methods in Public Policy
PPAM    6310     Seminar in Community & Economic          Development
PPAM    6311     Urban Policy, Planning and Management
PPAM    6312     Intergovernmental Relations
PPAM    6320     Environmental Policy and Management
PPAM    6340     Seminar in International and Development Policy and Management
PPAM    6341     Cases in Public Policy & Management
PPAM    6360     Non Profit Policy & Management
PPAM    6361     Non Profit Governance
PPAM    6363     Financial & Strategic Planning Issues for Non Profits
PPAM    6369     Legal Issues of Non Profit
PPAM    6370     Seminar in Health Care Policy and Management
PPAM   6376     Administrative Law
PPAM    6380     Current Issues in Public Policy and Management
PPAM 6381    Public Policies in the Mexico-U.S. Border Region
PPAM    7311 & 7312 Internship
 
Cognate area  elective courses are available, as approved by the MPPM advisor, including courses from cognate disciplines offering studies in concentration areas such as Government, Health Care Policy and Management, International and Development Policy and Management, Community and Economic Development, and Criminal Justice Policy and Management. 

Professional Report/Thesis: Minimum 3-6 credits:  
PPAM    7303     Professional Report (3 hours) or
PPAM    7301 & 7302      Thesis (6 hours)
 
Graduate Courses Descriptions
Public Policy and Management
PPAM6301 Principles of Public Administration
This course is an introduction to Public Administration and an overview of the field.  It examines the historical background and contemporary issues in the subject area.  Emphasis is placed on organizational theory and behavior. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PPAM    6302     Public Policy and Economics
This course examines public policy and program formulation implementation and evaluation including the politics and history of fiscal and monetary policy.  Some emphasis is placed on the theories and approaches used in public policy analysis.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PPAM    6302     Public Policy Analysis
This course introduces students to public policy analysis.  The broad scope includes an overview of policy development, the policy community, implementation strategies, and evaluative tools.  Various approaches to understanding public policy, its creation and limitations will be covered via diverse methodological and theoretical frameworks.  Lec 3, Cr 3

PPAM 6303 Public Budgeting and Finance
This course provides an introduction to the use of financial information in organizational decision-making.   A review of the budgetary process is included as well as an introduction to accounting practices in the public sector.  Lec 3, Cr 3

PPAM 6304 Theories of Public Organization
This course examines both the legal and the philosophical foundations of ethics.  Special emphasis is placed on the application and enforcement of ethical standards for public service.   Lec.3, Cr.3

PPAM    6305     Leadership and Ethics
This course delves into the historical, theoretical, behavioral, political and administrative perspective of leadership and its impact on decision making, and problem solving with special emphasis on the application and enforcement of ethical standards for public servants. 

PPAM 6306 Public Human Resource Management
This course is an examination of the history, theory and practice of human resource management in public organizations.  Some attention is given to cultural, ethnic and gender differences in the workplace.   Lec 3, Cr 3

PPAM 6307 Research Methods and Information Technology
This course covers the quantitative aspects of analysis and decision- making and the role and application of technology and information systems in data management.  Research design, the use of statistics and computer applications will be covered.   Lec.3, Cr. 3
 
PPAM 6308 International & Comparative Public Policy & Management
This course studies the similarities and differences in the organization, management, and public policy making among countries. It examines paradigms, theories and models along with the practical application to provide information for real management and policy problems. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PPAM 6309 Qualitative Methods and Public Policy
Qualitative Methods and Public Policy is an M.P.P.M. course designed to identify current qualitative methods of analysis in the public sector. The primary objective of the course is to acquaint students with the analytical and interpretive techniques in current use, including Action Research, Content Analysis, Ethnography, and Narratology. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PPAM 6310 Seminar in Community and Economic Development
This course is an introduction and overview of community and economic development. It encompasses zoning, transportation, comprehensive planning, and the relationship of education and infrastructure to economic development.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PPAM 6311 Urban Policy, Planning and Management
This course covers the administrative and political effects of the division of planning and management.  The development of urban planning techniques is covered.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PPAM    6312   Intergovernmental Relations
This course covers the administrative and political effects of the division of authority among the coordinate units of government. Federal-state, state-local, local-federal, state-state, local-local, and governmental relations are examined. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PPAM    6320   Environmental Policy & Management
This course is an introduction and overview of environmental policy and management at the local, state, national, and international level. It is designed to help students develop a working knowledge of the basic concepts of environmental policy and management. This includes its history, theories, methods, institutions, and issues and the guidelines and rules that establish goals and standards regarding the use and preservation of the physical environment, including soil, water, air, wildlife and vegetation. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PPAM    6340   Seminar in International and Development Policy and Management
Focuses on the changing roles and functions of different public and private international organizations and the services they provide.  Provides an understanding of the way intergovernmental organizations work and specific responsibilities of the various bodies and organizations such as the U.N., Security Council, General Assembly, ECOSOC, and regional economic commissions. Lec 3, Cr 3 
 
PPAM    6341   Cases in Public Policy and Management
This course focuses on applying knowledge to cases addressing public policies and management issues. This course can be repeated for up to 9 credit hours as long as the set of cases varies. Sets of cases are selected from subfields of policy and management. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PPAM    6360   Nonprofit Policy and Management
This course is an overview of nonprofit policy and management sector on a national and international scope. It covers the historical, descriptive, theoretical, and ethical issues relevant to the sector. It also covers the application of managerial concepts and techniques to the management, problems and concerns of nonprofit institutions and enterprises. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PPAM    6361   Nonprofit Governance
This course provides an overview of the characteristics and leadership of boards in nonprofit organizations. The course will cover the structure, functions, and composition of boards; the relation of boards to management; the board’s role in strategic planning; and improving boards performance and accountability. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PPAM    6363   Financial and Strategic Planning Issues for Nonprofits
This course provides an in-depth examination of successful financial management and strategic planning applications for nonprofit organizations. It provides an understanding of practical uses of positioning an organization in the community and service or advocacy arena; developing an integrated and diversified financial plan and creative strategy; and strategic and long-range planning. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PPAM    6369   Legal Issues in Nonprofits
This course provides an in-depth examination of the legal context and issues facing nonprofit organizations. This includes an understanding of the federal and state laws governing the organizational, tax, and political and legislative activities of nonprofit organizations; legal risk management for boards, employees and volunteers; and other related legal issues for nonprofit organizations;
Lec 3, Cr 3

PPAM    6370   Seminar in Health Care Policy and Management
This course provides a comprehensive overview of healthcare programs and policies in the United States.  Students will make use of case studies to understand the major stakeholders involved in healthcare and introduce them to current public health issues, healthcare delivery systems, and factors that determine health policy, and managerial practice.
 
PPAM    6371   Nonprofit Governance
This course provides an overview of the characteristics and leadership of boards in nonprofit organizations.  The course will cover the structure, functions, and composition of boards; the relation of boards to management, the board’s role in strategic planning, and improving boards performance and accountability.  Prerequisite:  PPAM 6360 or Advisor permission.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PPAM 6376 Administrative Law
The purpose of this course is an examination of rules and laws derived from the administrative agencies and administrative courts. Students will analyze relevant administrative law cases administrative rulemaking, and issues of legal oversight of administrative agencies and programs. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PPAM    6380   Current Problems in Public Policy and Management
This course focuses on current issues in public policy and management.  This course can be repeated for up to 9 credit hours as long as the topic varies.  Current problems are selected from international development, environmental, nonprofit, economic development, health care, criminal justice policy and management issues. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PPAM 6381 Public Policies in the Mexico-U.S. Border Region
This graduate level course examines the political dynamics and the main policy issues arising in the Mexico-U.S. international border region. It analyzes border politics and policy in the following 6 areas: 1) economic development, 2) labor, 3) migration, 4) public health, 5) the environment, and 6) security. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PPAM    7301     Thesis
This course required a student to work on/complete a thesis under the direction of a thesis committee.  The thesis will be defended publicly and approved by a majority of the committee.  See Graduate Catalog for more details.  Prerequisite:  Approval of graduate advisor. Lec 3, Cr 3

PPAM   7302      Thesis
This course required a student to work on/complete a thesis under the direction of a thesis committee.  The thesis will be defended publicly and approved by a majority of the committee.  See Graduate Catalog for more details.
Prerequisite:  Approval of graduate advisor. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PPAM   7303      Professional Report
This course requires the student to develop an applied project and professional report that focuses on the practice of public administration or public policy making or on related management/planning practices in a government, non-profit or private agency serving the public interest.  May be repeated until successful professional report defense.  Prerequisite:  PPAM 6301, 6302, 6307, seminar in specialization and/or approval of the advisor.
 
PPAM   7311      Internship
This course is a practical public management experience through an arranged internship in a governmental, non-profit or private agency serving the public interest.  Periodic seminars, supervision and a final administrative report are required. Lec 3, Cr 3 Prerequisite:  Approval of graduate advisor/department chair.  Pass/Fail Grade
 
PPAM    7312     Internship
This course is a practical public management experience through an arranged internship in a governmental, non-profit or private agency serving the public interest.  Periodic seminars, supervision and a final administrative report are required. Lec 3, Cr 3  Prerequisite:  Approval of graduate advisor/department chair.  Pass/Fail Grade

History
Dr. Thomas A. Britten, Chair
Mary Rose Cardenas Hall South #333
882-7379
Thomas.Britten@utb.edu
Graduate Faculty
William L. Adams, Professor
Thomas Britten, Associate Professor
David Fisher, Assistant Professor
Harriett D. Joseph, Professor
Milo Kearney, Professor Emeritus
Philip W. Kendall, Professor
Anthony K. Knopp, Professor Emeritus
Manuel F. Medrano, Professor
Philip Samponaro, Associate Professor
Angelika Potempa, Associate Professor
 
Master of Arts (M.A.) - History
The MA degree requires a total of 36 semester hours of graduate credit. The program offers a thesis or non-thesis degree option and encompasses a broad education in major fields of history, underlying methods and concepts, as well as a unique opportunity to examine the particular confluence of various strains of history that occur along the U.S. – Mexican border. For course descriptions and other information related to graduate studies, visit our website at http://wwwutb.edu/graduatestudies.   
 
Admission Requirements
Evidence of academic achievement and potential for advanced study and research are required for graduate admission. Specific criteria for Unconditional Admission for Master’s degree seeking students in History 
o    Undergraduate GPA of 3.0
o    GRE Verbal Score of 146 (400 if taken prior to August 2011)
o    GRE Analytical Score of 400/4.0
o    A Personal Statement of at least 1,000 words
o    6 undergraduate upper-division hours in history
 
Applicants with an undergraduate GPA of at least 2.5 and/or GRE scores lower than those specified will be considered for admission on a conditional basis. 
 
A complete application packet, including a graduate admission application and all supporting documents required by the department, must be submitted by:
July 1 – Fall
December 1 – Spring
May 1 – Summer.
 
Notification of decisions on graduate admission is made by the Office of Graduate Studies based on the admission criteria and recommendation of the History department. Information related to application procedures and deadlines is available through the Office of Graduate Studies.
 
36-Hour Thesis/Non-Thesis Program
Each student in the MA degree program will be assigned a Faculty Advisor. Together the student and the advisor will choose courses in history and a supporting field. Efforts are made to relate the material studied in the supporting field to the History discipline. A formal Program of Study as described in the Graduate Catalog will be prepared and submitted for approval by the Office of Graduate Studies.
 
Supporting Fields:
Biology, Business Administration, Criminal Justice, Communication, Education, English, Fine Arts, Geography, Government, Interpreting, Music, Psychology, Spanish, Sociology.
 
Thesis Option:
Fields in History:                           Credit Hours
The Historical Discipline…………………6
United States………………………………..6
Latin America/Borderlands………………6
European/World History………………….6
Thesis…………………………………………..6
Supporting Field…………………………….6
Total…………………………………………..36
 
Thesis
As part of their graduate program, students may choose the option of writing a thesis, for which they will receive 6 hours of graduate credit. Those who take this option must select a thesis committee, composed of a committee chairperson and two other members of the graduate faculty, to approve the topic and to assist in the preparation of the thesis. Students must pass an oral defense of the completed thesis. Students selecting this option will register for HIST 7300 and HIST 7301.
 
Non-Thesis Option
Fields in History:                          Credit Hours
The Historical Discipline…………………6
United States…………………………..…..6
Latin America/Borderlands…………….6
European/World History………………..6
Electives from any field of History…..6
Supporting Field..………………………….6
Total ………………………………………….36
 
Comprehensive Examination
Each candidate for the non-thesis Master of Arts in History degree must pass a comprehensive written examination prepared and administered by the graduate faculty and administered by the Office of Graduate Studies.

Financial Aid, Scholarships and Graduate Assistantships
The award of financial aid, scholarships, and graduate assistantships is based on need, academic achievement, and availability.  For more information, please inquire at the Office of Financial Aid, the Office of Graduate Studies and the History Department.

Graduate Certificate in History
The Graduate Certificate in History requires a total of nine semester hours of graduate credit. The certificate is offered as both a professional development opportunity for educators and as a gateway program to the History Department’s Master of Arts degree. It requires completion of HIST 6300 Historiography and Methods and two electives from the History graduate course offerings. Students are encouraged to focus their electives in a specific field of history (world, U.S., Latin America, borderlands). Students who successfully complete the certificate program may transfer their credits into the Master of Arts program of study. For more information, visit utb.edu/graduatestudies.
 
Admission Requirements
Evidence of academic achievement and potential for advanced study and research is required for graduate admission. Specific criteria for Unconditional Admission for history certificate students include one of the following:
o    Undergraduate GPA of 3.0
o    Three years professional experience in education or public history
o    GRE verbal score of 146 (400 if taken prior to August 2011) and Analytical score of 4.0
 
Also required is a personal statement of your professional goals (1,000 words).
 
A complete application packet, including a graduate admission application and all supporting documents required by the department, must be submitted by July 1 for fall admission, December 1 for spring and May 1 for summer.
 
Applicants with an undergraduate GPA below 3.0 but at least 2.5 and/or GRE scores lower than those specified will be considered for admission on a conditional basis.
 
Notification of decisions on graduate admission is made by the Office of Graduate Studies based on the admission criteria and recommendation of the academic department. Information related to application procedures and deadlines is available through the Office of Graduate Studies
 
Advising
Each student in the certificate program will meet with the History Department graduate program coordinator to plan a Program of Study (POS). A formal POS, as described in the Graduate Catalog, will be prepared and submitted for approval by the Office of Graduate Studies.
 
Financial Aid, Scholarships and Graduate Assistantships
The award of financial aid, scholarships and graduate assistantships is based on need, academic achievement and availability. For more information, inquire at the Office of Financial Aid, the Office of Graduate Studies and the History Department.
 
Graduate Course Descriptions
History
HIST     6300     Historiography and Methods
The course offers an overview of historiography and an introduction to the research and writing methods utilized and debated by historians.  The course covers topics of importance to professional historians in all fields, including basic and advanced research tools, the development of historical thinking, and recent developments in historical research.  Prerequisite: Admission to the MA or MAIS program.  Lec. 3 Cr 3
 
HIST     6301     Topics in American History to 1860
A survey and critique of the bibliography and problems of various eras in American history before the Civil War. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
HIST     6303     Topics in American History since 1860
A survey and critique of the bibliography and problems of various eras in American history since 1860. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
HIST     6305     History of the American West
The course analyzes the history of the American West and Frontier from the Appalachian Range to the Pacific Ocean with a special emphasis on the West as a distinctive region in the United States.  Prerequisite:  Admission to the MA or MAIS program.  Lec. 3, Cr.3
 
HIST     6307     Colonial America
This course is a reading and research seminar designed to familiarize students with important trends in Colonial American history and historiography.  Prerequisite: Admission to the MA or MAIS program.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
HIST     6309     Wars in American History
This course analyzes the wars the United States has engaged in since independence.  It focuses on topics such as causes, aims, and consequences of American warfare, mobilization, the contributions of different ethnic groups on the front and at home, and contemporary issues related to American warfare.
 
HIST     6312     Colonial Latin America
This course focuses on to selected major issues and themes in Colonial Latin American history with an emphasis on the development of colonial society, slavery and race. Prerequisite: Admission to MA or MAIS program.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
HIST     6313     Modern Latin America
This course focuses on to selected major issues and themes in Modern Latin American history with an emphasis on the development of society, culture, and politics. Prerequisite: Admission to the MA or MAIS Program.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
HIST     6314     US/Mexican Border Twin Cities
This course focuses on to major themes and topics in the history and historiography of border twin cities such as Brownsville/Matamoros, Tijuana/San Diego, El Paso/Juarez.  Prerequisite: Admission to the MA or MAIS Program.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
HIST     6315     Borderlands History
This course introduces students to major themes and topics of the history and historiography of the Mexican-American borderlands.  Emphasis is placed on the economy, immigration, culture and society.  Prerequisite:  Admission to the MA or MAIS program.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
HIST     6316     Studies in Mexican and American Heritages
An intensive investigation of selected historical problems in the Mexican-American and Anglo-American cultural heritages and the fusion and clash of these cultures. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
HIST     6317     Topics in Texas and Southwestern History
A survey and critique of the bibliography and problems of various eras in Texas and Southwestern history. May be repeated once for credit when topic varies. Prerequisites: Admission to the MA of MAIS program. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
HIST     6318    Topics in Latin American History
A survey and critique of the bibliography and problems of various eras in Latin American history. May be repeated once for credit when topic varies. Prerequisites: Admission to the Ma or MAIS program. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
HIST     6331     Topics in European/World History to 1650
The course investigates significant issues and themes in European or World History before 1650.  May be repeated for credit for a total of 3 times. Prerequisites: Admission to the MA or MAIS program. Lec 3, Cr 3

HIST     6333     Topics in European/World History since 1650
This course investigates significant issues and themes in European or World History after 1650. May be repeated for a credit for a total of 3 times when topic varies. Prerequisites:  Admission to the MA or MAIS program. Lec 3, Cr 3

HIST   6334  Modern European History
The course analyzes European history from 1789 to the present.  Its major focus is on topics such as industrialization and the emergence of the modern economic world system, the development of the nation-state, imperialism, the World Wars, genocide, rebuilding, and the changing role of Europe in the 21st century.  Prerequisite: Admission to MA or MAIS program.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
HIST     6335     The Atlantic World
This course connects the separate histories of Europe, Africa, North America, and the Caribbean since the 15th century.  The course emphasizes political, economic, and cultural relations among Africans, Americans and Europeans.  Prerequisite: Admission to MA or MAIS program.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
HIST     6336     Modern China
This course focuses on to major themes and topics of the history and historiography of China since 1900.  Prerequisite: Admission to MA or MAIS program.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
HIST     6337     World Revolutions
This course focuses on to major themes and topics in the history and historiography of revolutions from 1776 to the present Prerequisite: Admission to MA or MAIS program.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
HIST   6338  The World Wars
This course focuses on to the history and historiography of the world wars with an emphasis on the wars causes, conduct and consequences.  Prerequisite: Admission to MA or MAIS program. Lec. 3, Cr.3
 
HIST   6390  Research Seminar
This seminar trains students in identifying bodies of primary sources, familiarizes them with issues of analysis and historiography, and enables them to sustain a primary research project and to present their research findings in a paper.  Prerequisite: Admission to the MA program.  Completion of HIST 6300 and at least one graduate course in the area of the course being taught. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
HIST   7300  Thesis Research and Writing
Independent thesis research and writing.  May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Completed HIST 6390 and at least 15 credit hours in the history graduate program. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
HIST   7301  Thesis Research and Writing
Independent thesis research and writing.  May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Completed HIST 7300. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
Music
Dr. Sue Zanne Urbis, Chair
Eidman107-C
882-8247
sue.z.urbis@utb.edu

Graduate Faculty
Juan Pablo Andrade, Assistant Professor
Cristina Ballatori, Assistant Professor
James Arthur Brownlow, Professor
Katherine Geeseman, Assistant Professor
Jonathan Guist, Assistant Professor
Daniel Hunter-Holly, Assistant Professor
Susan Hurley-Glowa, Assistant Professor
Carol S. McNabb, Associate Professor
Thomas Nevill, Associate Professor
Kenneth Saxon, Associate Professor
Stephen Shoop, Assistant Professor
Michael O. Quantz, Professor
Richard Urbis, Professor
Sue Zanne Williamson-Urbis, Professor
 
Master of Music in Music Education (M.M.M.E.)
36-Hour Program
The Master of Music in Music Education degree is designed to prepare master teachers and musicians to be leaders in the field of music education.  It offers music educators in the Rio Grande Valley an opportunity to continue the development of their expertise and skills. It provides the growing number of music majors graduating from UTB with a means to continue their education, and it makes advanced training in music education available to music teachers from Mexico.   For course descriptions and other information related to graduate studies visit our website at http://www.utb.edu/graduatestudies.
 
Admission Requirements
Evidence of academic achievement and the potential for advanced study and research is required for graduate admission. Specific criteria for Unconditional Admission for Master’s degree seeking students in Music Education are:
o    Undergraduate GPA of 3.0
o    GRE Verbal score of 146 (400 if taken prior to August 2011)
o    GRE Analytical score of 4.0
o    Completion of at least four undergraduate semesters of music theory and three of music history and literature
o    The prospective candidate should also score a minimum of 80% on the Fine Arts Department Graduate Music Diagnostic.
o    Copy of valid teaching certificate
 
Applicants with an undergraduate GPA of at least 2.5 and/or GRE scores lower than those will be considered for admission on a conditional basis.

A complete application packet, including a graduate admission application and all supporting documents required by the department, must be submitted by
June 1st - Fall,
November 1st – Spring
May 1st - Summer.
 
Notification of decisions on graduate admission is made by the Office of Graduate Studies based on the admission criteria and recommendation of the academic department. Information related to application procedures and deadlines is available through the Office of Graduate Studies.
 
Project
As part of their graduate program, each student will complete a Master’s Project.  This is a capstone project completed to demonstrate each student’s mastery in the field of music education.  The project will be completed under the guidance of a graduate advisor.  At the completion of all coursework, students will register for MUSI 6390 as they are completing their project.
 
Degree Requirements
Required Courses: 18 hours
MUSI    5301     Research in Music Education                                                        3
MUSI    6306     Foundations of Music Education                                                   3
MUSI    6307     Survey of Music History of the Common Practice Period                 3
MUSI    6310     Hispanic Art Music                                                                      3
MUSI    6312     Theory and Form of Music from The Common Practice Period        3
MUSI    6390     Master’s Project                                                                         3
 
Prescribed Electives
MUSI    6304     Advanced Studies in Music Methodology                                       3
MUSI    6308     Advanced Studies in Music Literature                                           3
MUSI    6311     Topics in Music Theory                                                               3
MUSI    6389     Advanced Studies in Performance Practice                                                3
EDCI     6334     Curriculum Development –  Problems and Processes                     3
EDCI     6336     Problems in Education                                                                 3
 
Each student in the M.M. in Music Education degree program will be assigned a Faculty Advisor.  Together the student and advisor will plan the student’s program of study.  A formal Program of Study as described elsewhere in this catalog will be prepared and submitted for approval. 
 
Graduate Course Descriptions
Music
MUSI    5301     Research in Music Education
This is a bibliography course concerned with the techniques and resources available for effective research in music and music education.   Prerequisite: Graduate standing in music or departmental approval. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
MUSI    6304     Advanced Studies in Music Methodology
Intensive study of the principles and methods of music pedagogy.  May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Topics include: Orff Levels I, II, III; Kodaly Methodology; Advanced Single Reeds and Flute Technique; Advanced Double Reeds Techniques; Advanced Brass Techniques; Advanced Percussion Techniques; Advanced Strings Techniques; Advanced Vocal Techniques; Computer Applications in Music. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in music or departmental approval. Lec 3, Cr 3

MUSI    6306     Foundations of Music Education
This course examines the history and philosophy of music education in the public schools, with emphasis on the basic concepts needed for effective teaching in the field of music, curriculum development and evaluation of the music program.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing in music or departmental approval. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
MUSI    6307     Survey of Music History from the Common Practice Period
Survey of Music History from the Common Practice Period is a survey of musical styles, genres, composers and literature from the Western art music tradition from the Baroque period through the early Twentieth-Century.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing in music or departmental approval. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
MUSI    6308     Advanced Studies in Music Literature
Analytical and historical studies of a particular repertoire. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Topics include: Symphonic Literature, Wind Ensemble Literature, Choral Literature, and Operatic Literature. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in music or departmental approval. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
MUSI    6309     Topics in Music History
Historical studies of a particular period, school or musical tradition.  This course may be repeated twice for credit when the topic varies.  Prerequisite: Graduate Standing in music or departmental approval. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
MUSI    6310     Hispanic Art Music
This course is designed to explore the central features and major figures in the area of Hispanic Art music since 1950.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing in music or departmental approval.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
MUSI    6311     Topics in Music Theory
Analytical studies of various styles of music. May be repeated twice for credit when the topics vary. Topics include: Twentieth-Century Analytical Techniques (1900-1950) and Twentieth-Century Analytical Techniques (1950-present). Prerequisite: Graduate Standing in music or departmental approval. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
MUSI    6312     Theory and Form of Music from the Common Practice Period
The course examines music theory topics in diatonic and chromatic harmony, and continues with analysis of form.  Students will analyze large scale works, such as fugue and sonata form.  The course includes an aural skills component consisting of sight singing in moveable DO solfege, rhythm performance, and aural recognition.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing in music or departmental approval.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
MUSI    6389     Advanced Studies in Performance Practice
Practical studies of ensemble and applied performance. May be repeated when the topic varies. Topics include: Advanced Instrumental Conducting, Advanced Choral Conducting, Applied `Music Primary, Applied Music Secondary. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing in music or departmental approval. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
MUSI    6390  Master’s Project
This is a capstone project to demonstrate a student’s mastery in the field of music education.  The project will take the form of a paper and a presentation.  The project will be completed under the guidance of a graduate advisor.  Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of course work for the Master of Music in Music Education degree. Lec 3, Cr 3

Modern Languages
Dr. Dania López-García, Chair
Mary Rose Cardenas Hall South #286
882-6503
dania.lopezgarcia@utb.edu
 
Graduate Faculty
José Dávila-Montes, Associate Professor
Dania Lopez-Garcia, Associate Professor
Lucy García Willis, Professor
George K. Green, Professor
Suzanne Lalonde, Associate Professor
Elena Vega-Sampayo, Assistant Professor
 
Master of Arts (M.A.) - Spanish
36-Hour Thesis/Non-Thesis Program
The Master of Arts Degree in Spanish is offered by the College of Liberal Arts and gives students the option of a thesis or Non-Thesis program. The educational objectives of the program are to refine writing skills, develop research and bibliographic skills, study the nature and uses of language, study selected Spanish literature in depth and examine literary periods, styles, or movements in detail.  For more information, visit our website at utb.edu/graduatestudies.
 
Thesis
A student who chooses the thesis option will write a thesis for six hours of graduate credit. The student will choose a thesis committee composed of a committee chairperson and two other members of the Spanish graduate faculty, who will approve the thesis topic and assist in preparing the thesis. A written thesis prospectus must be formally approved by the thesis committee before the writing of the thesis begins. Thesis track students must pass a separate oral defense of the completed thesis.
 
Admission Requirements
Evidence of academic achievement and potential for advanced study and research is required for graduate admission. Specific criteria for Unconditional Admission for Master’s degree seeking students in Spanish are:
o    Undergraduate GPA of 3.0
o    GRE Verbal score of 146 (400 if taken prior to August 2011)
o    GRE Analytical score of 400/4.0
o    Letter from a Spanish program professor strongly recommending admission
o    Writing a satisfactory essay in Spanish.
o    Completed twelve undergraduate hours in Spanish at the junior or senior level, nine of which must be in Hispanic Literature.
o    Entry Interview.
Applicants with an undergraduate GPA of at least 2.5 and/or GRE scores lower than those specified will be considered for admission on a conditional basis.
 
Notification of decisions on graduate admission is made by the office of Graduate Studies based on the admission criteria and recommendation of the academic department. Information related to application procedures and deadlines is available through the Office of Graduate Studies.

Required Courses:  36 Hours
The Master of Arts degree with thesis option consists of 30 hours of coursework, all with a SPAN prefix or its equivalent, with six additional hours awarded for the thesis for a total of 36 semester hours. The Master of Arts degree in Spanish without a thesis option consists of 36 hours of coursework and may include a minor of 6 hours in a related field. At least 24 hours must be in courses with a SPAN prefix or its equivalent.  The courses for both plans must satisfy the following distribution requirements:
o    Spanish 6300: Academic Writing and Research Methods (to be taken during first year of graduate study)
o    Spanish 6301 Theory of Literary Analysis (to be taken during first year of graduate study)
oSPAN 6313 History of the Spanish Language or SPAN 6380 (with a linguistic topic)
oThree courses in Peninsular Literature, including two of the following: SPAN 6370, 6371, 6341
oThree courses in Spanish American Literature, including two of the following: SPAN 6373, 6374, 6375.
 
Comprehensive Examination
Each candidate for the Master of Arts degree is required to pass a comprehensive written examination prepared by the Spanish graduate faculty and administered by the Office of Graduate Studies.
 
Master of Arts (M.A.) - Spanish Translation and Interpreting
The M.A. in Spanish Translation and Interpreting requires a total of 36 semester hours of graduate credit. The program will provide instruction in the translation of general and specialized texts from English into Spanish and vice versa at a professional level. This program also covers the latest field-related technologies related to the production of translated texts.

Students in the program will become acquainted with Consecutive and Simultaneous Interpreting and will have the opportunity to further their knowledge and skills in these and other areas and subspecialties such as Legal, Medical, Finance Translation and Literary Translation. Practical and theoretical instruction will be provided in these submodalities. Additional required courses will cover Translation Theory, Research in Translation Studies and Translation Project Management.
 
Admission Requirements
Admission requirements will ensure that only adequately prepared candidates access the program. These requirements include:
o    Baccalaureate degree
o    Undergraduate GPA of 3.0
o    GRE Verbal 146 (400 if taken prior to August 2011)
o    GRE Analytical 4.0
o    Personal interview (can be carried out online via webcam)
o    3 letters of recommendation, academic or professional
o    Satisfactory performance on the translation of a document from English to Spanish and from Spanish to English.
o    Spanish-language version administered by ETS of the Graduate Record Examination (which includes sections in both English and Spanish) will be considered on a case by case basis.
o    GRE requirements may be waived upon completion of UTB’s Graduate Certificate in Spanish Translation
 
An undergraduate degree in Spanish is not required for admission to the program. The performance of the candidate in the admission essay and translation will provide evidence of adequate background or preparation in Spanish, and the concomitant need for additional preparation prior to admission. 
 
Applicants with an undergraduate GPA below 3.0 but at least 2.5 and/or GRE scores lower than those specified will be considered for admission on a conditional basis.
 
Notification of the decision on graduate admissions is made by the Office of Graduate Studies based on the admission criteria and recommendation of the academic department.  Information related to application procedures and deadlines is available through the Office of Graduate Studies. Visit our website at www.utb.edu/graduatestudies.
 
International Students
International students wishing to pursue online degrees are not eligible for an F1 or F3 student visa.
 
Degree Requirements
Category Semester                                                                             Credit Hours
Required Courses in Spanish Translation / Interpreting                              18
Prescribed Electives                                                                                12
Free Electives †                                                                                     6
TOTAL                                                                                                  36
 
Curriculum – MA in Spanish Translation and Interpreting
Prefix and Number      Required Courses                                                      SCH
TRSP/SPAN 6320            Translation Workshop: English-Spanish                3
TRSP/SPAN 6322            Translation Workshop: Spanish-English                3
TRSP/SPAN 6330             Translation Theory                                                        3
INTG 6376                    Consecutive Interpreting                                     3
TRSP 6395                      Translation /Research Project                             3
And one of the following:
INTG 6377                    Simultaneous Interpreting                                   3
INTG 6378                    Court Interpreting                                              3
INTG 6379                    Interpreting Practicum                                        3
INTG 6380                    Medical Interpreting & Terminology                     3
 
Prefix and Number    Prescribed Elective Courses                          SCH
TRSP/SPAN 6331          Translation Technologies                                      3
TRSP/SPAN 6332          Business and Finance Translation                          3
TRSP/SPAN 6334          Translation of Legal Texts                                   3
TRSP/SPAN 6335          Translation Topics                                                           3
TRSP/SPAN 6340          Audiovisual Translation                                        3
 (Or any other INTG course not taken as required)
 
† Free electives can be taken from other programs and fields, or–as any other course up to a total of 12 Cr.—transferred from different institutions (which can be especially convenient for students taking the program completely online and taking courses at universities closer to their areas of residency).However, students wishing to hone even further their skills and knowledge in Spanish Translation and Interpreting will be encouraged to take electives.
 
Graduate Certificate in Spanish Translation and Interpreting
15 hour Program
The Graduate Certificate in Translation Studies responds to the increasing demand of applied language courses among past, current and future graduate students in the M.A. Spanish program and the MAIS program with a concentration in Spanish.  This program can also be taken online.
The program will offer training in a set of professional skills devised to provide support in other professional studies programs with significant community impact, like nursing criminal justice, business management and media communication among others.
The certificate will encourage students who complete courses in the program with a GPA of 3.5 or higher to continue their graduate studies by pursuing the Master of Arts in Spanish or the MAIS with a concentration in Spanish or English.
 
Admission Requirements
Evidence of academic achievement and potential for advanced study and research is required for graduate admission. Admission requirements for the Certificate in Translation Studies are:
o    Entry interview
o    Letter of recommendation from the student’s undergraduate faculty advisor
o    Satisfactory performance on the Spanish essay.
o    Satisfactory performance essay on the translation of a document from English to Spanish and from Spanish to English.
Notification of decision on graduate admissions is made by the Office of Graduate Studies based on the admission criteria and recommendation of the academic department. Information related to application procedures and deadlines is available through the Office of Graduate Studies.
 
International Students
International students wishing to pursue online degrees are not eligible for an F1 or F3 student visa.
 
Required Courses: 15 hours
The Graduate Certificate in Spanish Translation requires the completion of 15 graduate hours in Translation courses under one or more rubrics (SPAN/TRSP) with a minimum GPA minimum GPA of 3.0.
 
Core Courses (9hrs)
TRSP/SPAN 6320            Translation Workshop: English – Spanish or
TRSP/SPAN 6322            Translation Workshop: Spanish – English
TRSP/SPAN 6330            Translation Theory

Electives (6hrs)
TRSP/SPAN 6331            Translation Technologies
TRSP/SPAN 6332            Business and Finance Translation
TRSP/SPAN 6334            Translation of Legal Texts
TRSP/SPAN 6335            Translation Topics
TRSP/SPAN 6340            Audiovisual Translation
TRSP 6395                     Translation/Research Project
INTG 6376                    Consecutive Interpreting
INTG 6377                    Simultaneous Interpreting
INTG 6378                    Court Interpreting
INTG 6379                    Interpreting Practicum
INTG 6380                    Medical Interpreting and Terminology
Prerequisites
Students wanting to pursue the Graduate Certificate in Spanish Translation must have a Bachelor’s degree with, at least 12 upper-division hours in Spanish.
 
Graduate Certificate in Court Interpreting
15 hour Program
The Graduate Certificate in Court Interpreting responds to the increasing demand of applied language courses among past, current and future graduate students in the M.A. Spanish program and the M.A.I.S. program with a concentration in Spanish. This program can also be taken online.
The program seeks to appeal both to practicing professionals and candidates who aim to obtain high-end interpreting abilities in the court and judiciary areas (translation of legal documents, simultaneous and consecutive interpreting), and who will greatly benefit from the 100% online nature of the program.
 
Admission Requirements
Evidence of academic achievement and potential for advanced study and research is required for graduate admission. Admission requirements for the Certificate in Court Interpreting are:
 
o    Entry interview
o    Letter of recommendation from the student’s undergraduate faculty advisor
o    Satisfactory performance on the Spanish essay
o    Satisfactory performance essay on the translation of a document from English to Spanish and from Spanish to English
Notification of decision on graduate admissions is made by the Office of Graduate Studies based on the admission criteria and recommendation of the academic department. Information related to application procedures and deadlines is available through the Office of Graduate Studies. Visit utb.edu/graduatestudies
 
International Students
International students wishing to pursue online degrees are not eligible for an F1 or F3 student visa. 
 
Required Courses: 15 hours
The Graduate Certificate in Court Interpreting requires the completion of 15 graduate semester credit hours in translation courses under one or more rubrics (SPAN/TRSP) with a minimum GPA of 3.0.

Core Course (3 Semester Credit Hours)
TRSP/SPAN        6320     Translation Workshop: English to Spanish
OR
TRSP/SPAN        6322     Translation Workshop: Spanish to English
AND
TRSP/SPAN        6334     Translation of Legal Texts
INTG                6376     Consecutive Interpreting
INTG                6377     Simultaneous Interpreting
INTG                6378     Court Interpreting
 
Graduate Courses Descriptions
Spanish
SPAN    6300     Academic Writing and Research Methods
Principals and procedures in scholarly writing, research and bibliographical methods.  To be taken during the first year of graduate study.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 12 hours of advanced Spanish, nine of which must be literature. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
SPAN    6301     Theory of Literary Analysis
Basic orientation in the theory and practice of literary analysis.  To be taken during the first year of graduate study.  Prerequisite:  SPAN 6300, graduate standing and 12 hours of advanced Spanish, nine of which must be literature.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
SPAN    6313     History of the Spanish Language
A detailed study of the growth of the Spanish language from beginning to present. Taught in Spanish. All readings, papers, and examinations in Spanish. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 12 hours of advanced Spanish, nine of which must be literature. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
SPAN    6320     Translation Workshop: English-Spanish
Intensive review of translation techniques and practice of translation from English into Spanish covering a variety of text typologies, including but not limited to general informative texts, literary texts, and technical texts.  Taught in Spanish.  All papers, and examinations in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPAN/TRSP 3332 or SPAN/TRSP 3333 or instructor’s approval.
 
SPAN    6322     Translation Workshop: Spanish-English
Intensive review of translation techniques and intensive practice of translation from Spanish into English covering a variety of text typologies, including but not limited to general informative texts, literary texts, and technical texts.  Taught in Spanish and English.  Prerequisite: SPAN/TRSP 3332 or SPAN/TRSP 3333 or instructor’s approval.
 
SPAN    6325     Specialized Translation
Intensive review of translation practices of specialized texts and intensive practice of translation from English into Spanish and vice-versa, covering a variety specialized text typologies, including but not limited to legal, business and economics, medical and scientific texts.  Taught in Spanish and English.  Prerequisite: TRSP/SPAN 6320 or TRSP/SPAN 6322.

SPAN    6330     Translation Theory
A survey of classic and contemporary translation theories.  Prerequisite: SPAN/TRSP 3332 or SPAN/TRSP 3333 or TRSP/SPAN 6320 or TRSP/SPAN 6322.

SPAN 6331 Translation Technologies
An overview of current practices in the usage of computer software for translation, including, but not limited to, computer assisted translation, terminology management, software localization and webpage translation. Prerequisites: TRSP/SPAN 3332 or TRSP/SPAN 3333 or TRSP/SPAN 6320 or TRSP/SPAN
6322 Lec 3, Cr 3
 
SPAN 6332 Business and Finance Translation
Intensive practice of translation with texts on business, finance and commerce, from English into Spanish and vice-versa, with close attention to national and international financial and trade institutions and practices. Prerequisites: TRSP/SPAN 3332 or TRSP/SPAN 3333 or TRSP/SPAN 6320 or TRSP/SPAN 6322 Lec 3, Cr 3
 
SPAN 6334 Translation of Legal Texts
Intensive practice of translation with texts of legal and judiciary nature, from English into Spanish and vice-versa, with close attention to national and international legal systems. Prerequisites: TRSP/SPAN 3332 or TRSP/SPAN 3333 or TRSP/SPAN 6320 or TRSP/SPAN 6322 Lec 3, Cr 3
 
SPAN    6335     Translation Topics
Several topics from the field of Translation Studies including but not limited to Literary Translation, Semiotics, Computer Assisted Translation, Textual Analysis and Linguistics Applied to Translation.  This course may be taken three times as topic varies.  Taught in Spanish.  All papers and examinations in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN/TRSP 3332 or SPAN/TRSP 3333 or TRSP/SPAN 6320 or TRSP/SPAN 6322.
 
SPAN    6339     Special Studies in Spanish American Literature
Special topics from the field of Spanish American Literature. Course may be taken three times as the topic varies. Taught in Spanish. All readings, papers, and examinations in Spanish.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 12 hours of advanced Spanish, nine of which must be literature. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
SPAN 6340 Audiovisual Translation
An overview of current practices in the translation of audiovisual materials, including, but not limited to, dubbing, subtitling, speech recognition, audiodescription, voice-over and videogames. Prerequisites: TRSP/SPAN 3332 or TRSP/SPAN 3333 or TRSP/SPAN 6320 or TRSP/SPAN 6322 Lec 3, Cr 3
 
SPAN    6341     Special Studies in Spanish Literature
Special topics from the field of Spanish literature. This course may be taken three times as the topic varies. Taught in Spanish. All readings, papers, and examinations in Spanish.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 12 hours of advanced Spanish, nine of which must be literature. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
SPAN    6370     The Literature of Medieval Spain
Critical study of the major works of Spanish literature from its origins down to the end of the 15th century. Taught in Spanish. All readings, papers, and examinations in Spanish.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 12 hours of advanced Spanish, nine of which must be literature. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
SPAN    6371     The Literature of the Golden Age of Spain
Critical study of major works of the Spanish Renaissance and Baroque Periods. Taught in Spanish. All readings, papers, and examinations in Spanish.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 12 hours of advanced Spanish, nine of which must be literature. Lec 3, Cr 3

SPAN    6373     Colonial Spanish American Literature
Critical study of major works of the Colonial Spanish America period.  Taught in Spanish.  All papers and exams in Spanish.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
SPAN    6374     19th Century Spanish American Literature
Critical study of major works of the Spanish American 19th Century period.  Taught in Spanish.  All papers and exams in Spanish.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
SPAN    6375     20th Century Spanish American Literatures
Critical study of major works of the Spanish American 20th century period.  Taught in Spanish.  All papers and exams in Spanish.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
SPAN    6380     Special Topics in Hispanic Language and Culture
Special topics in Hispanic language and culture, including but not limited to Translation, Interpreting, Grammar, Creative Writing, Chicano Literature, Folklore, and Journalism.  This course may be taken three times as the topic varies.  Taught in Spanish.  All readings, papers, and examination in Spanish.  Lec 3, Cr 3

SPAN    7300     Thesis
Pass/Fail Grade. Prerequisite: Approval of graduate advisor.

SPAN    7301     ThesPass/Fail Grade. Prerequisite: Approval of graduate advisor.
 
Translation
TRSP     6395     Translation/Research Project
Mini-thesis, research or translation project, of a theoretical or practical nature, including but not limited to empirical research, hermeneutical or linguistic analysis, or the translation of a complete literary, academic or technical work. 
Prerequisite: SPAN/TRSP 6330 and TRSP/SPAN 6320 or TRSP/SPAN 6322.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
TRSP     6320     Translation Workshop: English-Spanish
Intensive review of translation techniques and practice of translation from English into Spanish covering a variety of text typologies, including but not limited to general informative texts, literary texts, and technical texts.  Taught in Spanish.  All papers, and examinations in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPAN/TRSP 3332 or SPAN/TRSP 3333 or instructor’s Approval.

TRSP     6322     Translation Workshop: Spanish-English
Intensive review of translation techniques and intensive practice of translation from Spanish into English covering a variety of text typologies, including but not limited to general informative texts, literary texts, and technical texts.  Taught in Spanish and English. Prerequisite: SPAN/TRSP 3332 or SPAN/TRSP 3333 or instructor’s approval.
 
TRSP     6325     Specialized Translation
Intensive review of translation practices of specialized texts and intensive practice of translation from English into Spanish and vice-versa, covering a variety specialized text typologies, including but not limited to legal, business and economics, medical and scientific texts.  Taught in Spanish and English. Prerequisite: TRSP/SPAN 6320 or TRSP/SPAN 6322.
TRSP     6330     Translation Theory
A survey of classic and contemporary translation theories.  Taught in Spanish.  All papers and examinations in Spanish. 
Prerequisite: SPAN/TRSP 3332 or SPAN/TRSP 3333 or TRSP/SPAN 6320 or TRSP/SPAN 6322.
 
TRSP 6331 Translation Technologies
An overview of current practices in the usage of computer software for translation, including, but not limited to, computer assisted translation, terminology management, software localization and webpage translation. Prerequisites: TRSP/SPAN 3332 or TRSP/SPAN 3333 or TRSP/SPAN 6320 or TRSP/SPAN 6322 Lec 3, Cr 3
 
TRSP6332 Business and Finance Translation
Intensive practice of translation with texts on business, finance and commerce, from English into Spanish and vice-versa, with close attention to national and international financial and trade institutions and practices. Prerequisites: TRSP/SPAN 3332 or TRSP/SPAN 3333 or TRSP/SPAN 6320 or TRSP/SPAN 6322 Lec 3, Cr 3
 
TRSP 6334 Translation of Legal Texts
Intensive practice of translation with texts of legal and judiciary nature, from English into Spanish and vice-versa, with close attention to national and international legal systems. Prerequisites: TRSP/SPAN 3332 or TRSP/SPAN 3333 or TRSP/SPAN 6320 or TRSP/SPAN 6322 Lec 3, Cr 3
 
TRSP     6335   Translation Topics
Several topics from the field of Translation Studies including but not limited to Literary Translation, Semiotics, Computer Assisted Translation, Textual Analysis and Linguistics Applied to Translation.  This course may be taken three times as topic varies.  Taught in Spanish.  All papers and examinations in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN/TRSP 3332 or SPAN/TRSP 3333 or TRSP/SPAN 6320 or TRSP/SPAN 6322.
 
TRSP 6340 Audiovisual Translation
An overview of current practices in the translation of audiovisual materials, including, but not limited to, dubbing, subtitling, speech recognition, audio description, voice-over and videogames. Prerequisites: TRSP/SPAN 3332 or TRSP/SPAN 3333 or TRSP/SPAN 6320 or TRSP/SPAN 6322 Lec 3, Cr 3
 
TRSP 6395 Translation /Research Project
Mini-thesis, research or translation project, of a theoretical or practical nature, including but not limited to empirical research, hermeneutical or linguistic analysis, or the translation of a complete literary, academic or technical work. Prerequisites: TRSP/SPAN 6330, and TRSP/SPAN 6320 or TRSP/SPAN 6322 Lec 3, Cr 3
 
Interpreting
INTG    6376     Consecutive Interpreting
Intensive practice in consecutive interpreting with close reference to actual usages among professional interpreters in the United States. Prerequisites: INTG/TRSP 4366 and INTG/TRSP 4367 Lec 3, Cr 3
 
INTG    6377     Simultaneous Interpreting
Intensive practice in simultaneous interpreting with close reference to actual usages among professional interpreters in the United States. Prerequisites: INTG/TRSP 4366 and INTG/TRSP 4367 Lec 3, Cr 3
 
INTG    6378     Court Interpreting
Intensive study and practice of sight translation, consecutive and simultaneous interpreting with reference to judiciary application. Prerequisites: INTG/TRSP 4366 and INTG/TRSP 4367 Lec 3, Cr 3

INTG    6379     Interpreting Practicum
Intensive study and practice of sight translation, consecutive and simultaneous interpreting with close reference to terminology, documentation, ethics, and other professional issues. May be taken together with INTG 6378.  Prerequisites: INTG 6376 or INTG 6377 or INTG  6378 or instructor’s approval.
 
INTG    6380     Medical Interpreting and Terminology
Intensive study of English and Spanish Medical Terminology with a close focus on Medical Interpreting professional practice, code of ethics and translation of medical records.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
Master of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies
36-Hour Program
The MAIS degree requires a total of 36 semester hours of graduate credit.  Students in the MAIS Program synthesize coursework drawn from two or more of the core disciplines of English, History, Interdisciplinary Studies, Music, Sociology and Spanish to explore topics that may be successfully pursued from an interdisciplinary perspective.  The students may also enroll in courses from Biology, Business Administration, Communication, Education, Government, Psychology, Public Policy and Management, and closely related fields (described below).  Students develop an individualized program of study that lets them achieve their specific intellectual goals.  The faculty strengths lie in the areas of borderlands studies, community college, teaching, sociology, and sustainable development.  For course descriptions and other information related to graduate studies, visit our website at www.utb.edu/graduatestudies.
 
Overview of Themes
Students may choose to specialize in one of the themes listed below:
 
BORDERLANDS STUDIES
Borderlands Studies investigates the society and culture that emerges in areas dissected by important socio-political borders.  UTB is located in the heart of the Rio Grande Valley, a vibrant borderland region that serves as an intersection of cultures.  As such, our faculty has conducted research on colonia development, cross-border social justice movements, migration, border security, maquiladora economics, and local and regional history and culture.  Students opting for this concentration will find abundant research opportunities in these areas.  Our program is geared for those interested in working in the field of regional socioeconomic development.
 
COMMUNITY COLLEGE TEACHING
This concentration prepares you to teach in a selected academic discipline at the community college level.  Students (in consultation with the faculty) incorporate nine credit hours from the College of Education (from our approved list of education courses, see below) along with 18 credit hours in a specific discipline into their MAIS Program of Study to construct a skill set applicable to teaching in a community college setting.
 
INDIVIDUALIZED STUDIES
Students who are able to identify an individually tailored program of study may combine course offerings from across disciplines to meet their unique educational goals.  Our interdisciplinary flexibility allows students to develop skills that are suited for their particular careers in business and education.
 
SOCIOLOGY
Students interested in graduate studies in sociology will find course offerings in globalization, minorities, health, deviance, aging, and gender.  Theoretical perspectives covered include symbolic interactionism, functionalism, and materialism.

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
The sustainable development concentration combines courses from Public Policy and Management with courses from biology to give students an education in the intersection of science, politics, and ecology.
 
Admission Requirements
Evidence of academic achievement and potential for advanced study and research is required for graduate admission.  Specific criteria for Unconditional Admission for Master’s degree seeking students in interdisciplinary studies are:
o    Undergraduate GPA of 3.0
o    GRE Verbal Score of 146 (400 if taken prior to August 2011)
o    GRE Quantitative Score of 140 (400 if taken prior to August 2011)
o    GRE Analytical Score of 400/4.0
(These scores reflect the traditional GRE scoring system, new scoring system entails analogous scores)
o    2 satisfactory letters of recommendation (one must be from a former undergraduate professor)
o    A satisfactory essay of approximately 600 words, addressing why the student feels that he or she should be admitted into the program, and any additional information the faculty should consider regarding admission into the program.
 
Applicants with an undergraduate GPA of at least 2.5 and/or GRE scores lower than those specified will be considered for admission on a conditional basis.  A complete application packet, including a graduate admission application and all supporting documents required by the College of Graduate Studies must be submitted by May 1 for fall, November 1 for spring, and April 1 for summer. 
Notification of decisions on graduate admission is made by the Office of Graduate Studies based on the admissions criteria and recommendation of the MAIS Graduate Admissions Committee.  Information related to application procedures and deadlines is available through the Office of Graduate Studies.
 
Master’s Committee
Each student in the MAIS degree must create a committee that includes a faculty advisor and two additional faculty members who teach in interdisciplinary studies.  Students choose from three options for completing their degrees:  (1) thesis track, (2) capstone project track, and (3) comprehensive examination track (see below).  For students on the thesis track, the committee will advise in development of the thesis and its grading.  For students on the capstone experience track, the committee will provide advice and grade the capstone project.  For students on the comprehensive exam track, the committee will develop and grade the exam.  In addition, a formal “Program of Study” as described elsewhere in this catalog will be prepared and submitted for approval. 
 
Themes and Degree Requirements
Students who choose 18 credit hours of coursework from within a concentration may receive recognition for its completion.  Students may specialize in one concentration only.
 
Also, note that regardless of concentration, no more than 18 credit hours of coursework in any one discipline  can apply to the MAIS Degree.  The remaining 18 credit hours of study must be drawn from two or more disciplines (e.g., History, Government/MPPM, Sociology, etc.), with at least 6 hours in each supporting field.  The course prefixes identify these disciplinary boundaries.
 
BORDERLANDS STUDIES
Students who choose 18 credit hours of coursework selected from the Borderlands Studies Concentration, and up to 18 credit hours of electives.  No more than 18 credit hours may be from any one discipline and the electives must be drawn from two or more disciplines (e.g., History, Government/MPPM, Sociology, etc.), with at least 6 hours in each supporting field. 
 
Required Courses within the Borderlands Studies Concentration (12 hours)
HIST     6315     Borderlands History
HIST     6414     US/Mexico Border Twin Cities
PPAM    6381     Public Policies in Mexico-US Border Region
INDS     6333     Theories of Knowledge
 
Electives Courses within the Borderlands Studies Concentration (choose at least 6 hours)
BIOL     5327     Coastal Ecology
GOVT    6376     US-Mexico-Central America and Caribbean Relations
HIST     6312     Colonial Latin America
HIST     6313     Modern Latin America
HIST     6316     Topics in Mexican and American Heritages
HIST     6317     Topics in Texas and Southwest History
HIST     6318     Topics in Latin American History
HIST     6335     The Atlantic World
SOCI     6313     Minorities
SOCI     6323     Mexican-American Presence
SOCI     6374     Globalization
TRSP     6320     Translation Workshop English to Spanish
TRSP     6322     Translation Workshop English to Spanish
Elective Courses Outside of the Borderlands Concentration (up to 18 hours)
Elective Courses outside of the concentration selected in consultation with advisor.
 
Learning Outcomes:
o    Demonstrate understanding of the basic theories and issues surrounding human rights law.
o    Demonstrate understanding of modern theories of class, ethnicity, and race.
o    Demonstrate understanding of US immigration policy.
 
COMMUNITY COLLEGE TEACHING
Courses from education that meet our programmatic requirements are as follows:
Required Courses within the Community College Teaching Concentration (18 hours).  Disciplines include History, Government/MPPM, English, Music, Sociology, and Spanish
 
Required Education Courses (15 hours)
EDTC    6321     Instructional Design
EDTC    6323     Multimedia/Hypermedia
EDTC    6325     Educational Communications
EDTC    6358     Theory and Practice of E-Learning
INDS     6333     Theories of Knowledge
 
Electives:  6 credit hours, with at least 6 hours in each supporting field (must be approved by the MAIS committee).
Learning Outcomes:
o    Demonstrate understanding of the basic principles of effective pedagogy.
o    Demonstrate competence in a particular discipline.

INDVIDUALIZED STUDIES
Students select 36 credit hours of graduate courses of which no more than 18 credit hours may pertain to a single discipline.  The remaining 15 credit hours of study must be drawn from two or more disciplines, with at least 6 hours in each supporting field.  Courses are selected in consultation with the student’s Graduate Advisor.
 
INDS     6333     Theories of Knowledge
 
Individualized Study Courses within the Primary Discipline (18 hours)
 
Individualized Study Courses from Two or More Other Disciplines (15 hours)
Learning Outcome:
o    Demonstrate competence in the interdisciplinary application of concepts to a particular problem.
 
SOCIOLOGY
Students concentrating in sociology must complete 36 credit hours of graduate courses of which no more than 18 credit hours may pertain to sociology.  The remaining 18 credit hours of study must be drawn from two or more disciplines, with at least 6 hours in each supporting field.  Students must successfully complete the required courses for sociology concentration, which are listed below.
 
Required Courses within the Sociology Concentration (12 hours)
SOCI     6313     Minorities
SOCI     6333     Theory
SOCI     6374     Globalization
INDS     6333     Theories of Knowledge
 
Electives Courses within the Sociology Concentration (choose at least 6 hours)
SOCI     6323     Mexican-American Presence
SOCI     6324     Health
SOCI     6325     Contemporary Issues in Sociology
SOCI     6353     Deviance
SOCI     6363     Gender
SOCI     6373     Aging
 
Other Electives for the Sociology Concentration: (up to 15 hours)
Learning Outcomes:
o    Demonstrate competence in assessing sociological concepts.
o    Demonstrate familiarity with the theoretical perspectives within the discipline.
o    Identify and employ research designs appropriate to the study of social life.
 
SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
Students concentrating in sustainable development must complete 36 credit hours of graduate courses of which no more than 18 credit hours may pertain to a single discipline.  The remaining 18 credit hours of study must be drawn from two or more disciplines, with at least 6 hours in each supporting field.
 
Required Courses within the Sustainable Development Concentration (12 hours)
BIOL     5422     Conservation Biology
BIOL     5370     Restoration Ecology
PPAM    6302     Public Policy and Analysis
INDS     6333     Theories of Knowledge
 
Electives Courses within the Sustainable Development Concentration (choose at least 9 hours)
BIOL     5315     Biological Basis of Emerging Diseases
BIOL     5327     Coastal Ecology
BIOL     5370     Topics in Biology
BLAW   6301     Legal Environment of Business
ECON    6301     Business Economics
GOVT    6380     US-Mexico, Central American and Caribbean Relations
PPAM    6310     Seminar in Community and Economic Development
PPAM    6311     Urban Policy, Planning, and Management
PPAM    6320     Environmental Policy and Management
PPAM    6340     Seminar in International Development Policy and Management
PPAM    6360     Nonprofit Policy and Management
PPAM    6371     Nonprofit Governance
PPAM    6370     Seminar in Health Care Policy and Management
SOCI     6324     Health
SOCI     6374     Globalization
 
Other Electives for the Sustainable Development Concentration:  (up to 15 hours)
Learning Outcomes:
o    Demonstrate understanding of the basic principles of scientific inquiry.
o    Demonstrate understanding of basic principles of ecology.
o    Demonstrate understanding of basic principles of economic development.
 
Thesis Option
As part of their graduate program, students may choose the option of writing a thesis, for which they will receive six hours of graduate credit.  The thesis option is particularly suitable for students intending on eventually entering a doctoral program.  Those students who take the thesis option must form a Master’s Committee, composed of a Committee Chairperson and two other members of the graduate faculty.  The committee approves the thesis topic and advises on the preparation of the thesis.  (See thesis or non-thesis option under “Academic Information”).  Students must pass an oral defense of the complete thesis.  Students selecting this option will register for INDS 7300 and 7301 after they complete their coursework.
 
Requirements for the Thesis Option
INDS     7300     Thesis (3 credit hours)
INDS     7301     Thesis (3 credit hours)
 
Electives:  (27 credit hours of graduate credit of which no more than 18 hours may be from any one discipline and no more than 12 semester hours may be taken from the professional schools).  At least two of the elective classes (6 credit hours) must be upper-level (6000) coursework.  The thesis track is recommended for those wishing to later pursue a doctoral degree.
 
Electives may be taken in any of the following areas:  biology, business administration, communication, criminal justice, education, English, fine arts, geography, government, history, interdisciplinary studies, interpreting, music, psychology, public policy and management, sociology, and Spanish.
 
Requirements for the Capstone Experience Option
INDS     6334     Capstone Experience (3 credit hours)
 
Electives:  (33 credit hours) The Capstone option is designed to meet the needs of students who after graduation will be working in government, business, or education.  The option provides a flexible format for developing a creative project that demonstrates the potential of interdisciplinary studies.  The capstone project may consist of a research report, a publishable paper, or some other creative endeavor agreed upon by the student and their Master’s Committee.  (36 credit hours of graduate credit of which no more than 18 hours may be from any one discipline and no more than 12 semester hours may be taken from the professionals schools).  At least two of the elective classes (6 credit hours) must be upper-level (6000) coursework. 
 
Electives may be taken in any of the following areas:  biology, business administration, communication, criminal justice, education, English, fine arts, geography, government, history, interdisciplinary studies, interpreting, music, psychology, public policy and management, sociology, and Spanish.
 
The Capstone Experience track requires the student to enroll in INDS 6334: Capstone Experience their final semester, during which they will complete a project agreed upon by their Master’s Committee.  The project may be a publishable paper or a similar research project designed to showcase the student’s abilities.
 
Requirements for the Comprehensive Examination Option
Electives:  The Comprehensive Examination option provides flexibility for students who best demonstrate their knowledge in exam situations.  Students take 36 credit hours of which no more than 18 hours may be from any one discipline and no more than 12 semester hours may be taken from the professional schools.  At least two of the elective classes (6 credit hours) must be upper-level coursework.
 
Electives may be taken in any of the following areas:  biology, business administration, communication, criminal justice, education, English, visual arts, geography, government, history, interdisciplinary studies, interpreting, music, psychology, public policy and management, sociology, and Spanish.
 
Students in the comprehensive exam option must pass a comprehensive exam which is taken in their final semester.
 
An MAIS Degree requires successful completion of 36 hours of coursework.  Students may individualize their program of study in consultation with their faculty advisor.  Should a student wish to obtain specialization in one of the four non-individualized program concentrations, 18 credit hours of their coursework will be selected from the courses listed within that concentration.
 
Additional Courses in Liberal Arts
Arts
ARTS    6300     Graduate Studio Problems in Drawing Arts
This course is the study of technical, formal and conceptional aspects of drawing on a graduate level.  This course may be repeated for credit up to 12 hours when content varies.  Prerequisites: Students must hold a Bachelor’s degree that included 6 hours of advanced undergraduate Drawing.  Candidates must submit a portfolio of their artwork and be interviewed by the graduate art faculty or graduate advisor before registering for this course.  Lec  2, Lab 4, Cr 3
 
ARTS    6310     Graduate Studio Problems in Painting
This course is the study of technical, formal and conceptional aspects of painting on a graduate level. This course may be repeated for credit up to 12 hours when content varies. The content of this course is subject to instructor approval.  Prerequisites: Students must hold a Bachelor’s degree that included 6 hours of advanced undergraduate drawing and painting. Candidates must submit a portfolio of their artwork and be interviewed by the graduate art faculty or graduate advisor before registering for this course. Lec 2, Lab 4, Cr 3
 
ARTS    6311     Graduate Studio Problems in Ceramics
This course is the study of a variety of pottery and sculpture techniques, and of the development of individual expression through the use of volume, form, space and mass at the graduate level. This course may be repeated for credit up to 12 hours when the content varies.: Students must hold a Bachelor’s degree that included 6 hours of advanced undergraduate ceramics. Candidates must submit a portfolio of their artwork and be interviewed by the graduate art faculty before registering for this course. Lec 2, Lab 4, Cr 3
 
ARTS    6312     Graduate Studio Problems in Sculpture
This course is the study of technical, formal and conceptual aspects of 3 dimensional design and sculpture on a graduate level. This course may be repeated for credit up to 12 hours when content varies. The content of this course is subject to instructor approval. Prerequisite:  Bachelor’s Degree and Texas Teacher’s Certification. Lec 2, Lab 4, Cr 3
 
ARTS    6320     Current Topics in Art Education
This class explores the ever changing environment of schools, curriculum and the general problems of the working art educator in today’s educational environment. It will provide the student with tools and strategies that are relevant to art education and teaching as a whole. Prerequisite:  Bachelor’s Degree and Texas Teacher’s Certification. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
ARTS    6321     Art Education in Western History
This course will look at Art Education in Western history from its origins to today, focusing on its social context, philosophical background, and relevance. This course will provide a view on the events in Art, Art History, and Culture that have shaped the course of art education. Prerequisite:  Bachelor’s Degree and Texas Teacher’s Certification. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
ARTS    6325     Art Education Studio
This class will address an overall view of studio in both 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional disciplines. It will emphasize a holistic studio experience and the class will take a generalist approach to studio activities. This experience will translate into a wide range of studio activities for future classroom instruction.             Prerequisite:  Bachelor’s Degree and Texas Teacher’s Certification. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
ARTS    6330     Advanced Studies in Art History and Criticism
This course is an analysis at the graduate level of selected areas of art history and criticism from established periods and styles of art. This course may be repeated for up to 12 hours when the subject content varies. Admission to this course is subject to instructor approval.  Prerequisites: Students must hold a Bachelor’s degree that included 6 hours of advanced undergraduate art history. Candidates must submit a portfolio of their artwork and be interviewed by the graduate art faculty before registering for this course. Lec 3, Cr 3

Communication
COMM   6301     Introduction to Communication Studies
A survey of qualitative and quantitative traditions in communication research, review of statistical methodology and major communication theories.

COMM   6302     Critical Approaches to Mass Communication and Society
This course introduces students to a variety of methods for the purpose of understanding the role of mass communication in contemporary society. Lec 3, Cr 3

COMM   6303     Special Topics in Communication
Course offered covers a variety of communication topics related to the study of human communication, among those topics would be intercultural communication, interpersonal communication and applied statistics for behavioral research in communication.  Course may be repeated 2 times for credit when topic varies.  Lec 3, Cr 3

COMM   6312     Organizational Communication and Change
This graduate seminar will provide an in-depth application of general systems theory to organizational effectiveness with a focus on creating learning organizations.  Lec 3, Cr 3

COMM   6330     Seminar in New Mass Communication Technologies
This course examines current and anticipated communication technologies and how these technologies influence communication within peer groups, organizations, and among consumers.  Lec 3, Cr 3

Criminal Justic
CRIJ      6301     Criminal Justice System
This course is designed to give students a current, thorough, and comprehensive overview of all facets of the criminal justice system in the United States, its functions, current controversial issues and future trends. The philosophy, history, and development of criminal justice agencies will be examined. Lec 3, Cr 3

CRIJ      6302     Crime, Criminal Behavior, and Criminology
Major theoretical approaches to the study of crime and criminology, including biological, economic, political, psychological, and sociological views on crime and criminal behavior will be examined. Lec 3, Cr 3

CRIJ      6303     Criminal Justice Policy Analysis
An analysis of the development, implementation, and evaluation of criminal justice policy. Several policies will be studied and analyzed regarding their development and implementation. Lec 3, Cr 3

CRIJ      6304     Law, Courts, and Criminal Procedure
Advanced study of the legal system of the United States. Discussion of the sociology of law as related to the application and operation of the judicial system and police procedure. Analysis of current research and literature related to the United States legal system.

CRIJ      6305     Criminal Justice Organizational Theory and  Behavior
Advanced examination and evaluation of management, organization, and administration of criminal justice agencies. Lec 3, Cr 3

CRIJ      6306     Statistical Methods in Criminal Justice
Advanced statistical methods used in criminal justice research, including multivariate analysis and application of computerized statistical programs in analyzing criminal justice data will be examined. Lec 3, Cr 3

CRIJ      6307     Criminal Justice Research Methods
Examination of theory, techniques, methods, and applications of quantitative analysis in criminal justice, with emphasis upon experimental design and collection, tabulation, and analysis of in-field data.  Prerequisite: CRIJ 6306 or consent of instructor. Lec 3, Cr

CRIJ      6308     Juvenile Justice System
An overview of the juvenile justice system in the United States. The administration of juvenile institutions and agencies, the juvenile court system, theories of juvenile delinquency and innovative strategies for treatment. Current research and trends in juvenile justice will be examined. Lec 3, Cr 3

CRIJ      6309     Issues in Corrections
Examination of correctional philosophy, contemporary correctional issues, administration and management of correctional institutions. The role of probation and parole and analysis of community-based corrections and related topics in corrections. Lec 3, Cr 3

CRIJ      6310     Issues in Policing
Examination and discussion of current trends and issues related to policing in the United States. Evaluation of current strategies of policing and their application in police agencies. Lec 3, Cr 3

CRIJ      6311     Special Topics in Criminal Justice
This course gives graduate students an opportunity to study contemporary issues in crime and criminal justice. This course will also focus attention on international criminal justice issues and topics. May be repeated once as the topics vary. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
CRIJ      6312   Independent Research and Study
Independent study designed to provide an opportunity for students to pursue research and/or participate with graduate faculty in research for publication or professional presentation. Students may also opt under this course to study in-depth theoretical/empirical readings in a substantive area not normally covered in standard courses. Prerequisite: prior approval of Graduate Program Director and consent of instructor. Can be taken twice for credit. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
CRIJ      7301-7302 Thesis
The student is required to complete an individual research project under the direction and supervision of a graduate thesis committee. The thesis will be defended publicly and approved by a majority of the thesis committee. Prerequisite: Approval of Graduate Program Director. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
CRIJ      7303-7304 Applied Research Project
The student is required to complete a problem-oriented applied research project under the supervision of a graduate project committee. The project must be approved by a majority of the project committee. Prerequisite: Approval of Graduate Program Director.
 
Government
GOVT    6310   Seminar and Problems in Political Science
A survey and critique of the bibliography and problems in various fields of political science. Course may be repeated for credit as topics vary.  (May be repeated up to 3X). Lec 3, Cr 3
 
GOVT    6367   American Judicial Process
Advanced study of the structure, functions and procedures of the national, state and local judicial systems, the interrelationship between the American judiciary and other components of the political system; the impact of judicial decision-making on public policy. Lec 3, Cr 3
GOVT    6368   Public Law
Advanced study of American Public Law, which will include an examination of the structures, functions, and procedures of the national and state legal systems, based on constitutional government, as well as the impact of public law on policy development and implementation and the management of American public organizations, institutions, and agencies.  Special emphasis will be placed on the role of employment discrimination law in the public organization milieu. Lec 3, Cr 3  Prerequisites: PPAM 6301, PPAM 6302, or advisor permission.
 
GOVT    6376   United States-Mexico, Central America & Caribbean Relations
Study of the formulation, conduct and consequences of U.S. foreign policy in Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. The roles of the President, Congress, interest groups, the military and intelligence agencies, and public opinion will be examined. Specific cases of major foreign policy decisions will be examined. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
GOVT    6388   Major Political Ideologies
Advanced study of critical political philosophers who have influenced the political experience. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
Interdisciplinary Studies
INDS     6333     Theories of Knowledge
This class examines epistemology with emphasis on how it pertains to the
social sciences and humanities.
 
INDS     7300   Thesis Cr 3
INDS     7301    Thesis Cr 3

Sociology
SOCI     6313     American Minorities
A study of the principal minority groups in American society and their sociological significance; problems of intergroup relations, social movements, and related social changes occurring on the contemporary American scene. A research project and supporting specialized readings will be emphasized. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
SOCI     6324     Problems of U.S. Health Care Systems
A seminar course that allows student investigation into the nature and functioning of the health care institutions of modern industrial societies, with special emphasis on current problems in providing health care to the complex social populations of the U.S., especially to the poor and to racial and ethnic minorities. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
SOCI     6325     Contemporary Issues in Sociology
A survey and review of recent developments in sociological research and theory. Topics may vary and it may be taken twice for credit. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
SOCI     6333     Pro-Seminar on Sociological Theory
An intensive analysis of the current state of sociological theory with consideration of the historical influences on contemporary thought. Major theoretical issues in the discipline and within the social/behavioral sciences are considered. The relationships between theory and research are emphasized. (Required of MAIS students with concentration in sociology.) Lec 3, Cr 3
 
SOCI     6343     Globalization: Issues of Inequality, Conflict and     Integration
This course will examine the ways in which national societies relate to each other at various levels of interaction: Cultural, economic, social, environmental and military and seek to find an identity and place in the emergent world system. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
SOCI     6353     Sociology of Deviance
An examination of the nature, types, causes, and social control of deviant behavior with focus on the macro and micro levels of analysis.  Emphasis is placed on discriminate fluency of diverse deviance imageries and subsequent research protocols. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
SOCI     6363     Gender
The course will study and analyze the social construction of gender in United States society today.
 
SOCI     6373     Problems of Aging in U.S. and World Societies
A seminar analysis of the demographic, economic, social, political, and health care problems created by the “aging” of the population of industrial societies. Special attention is paid to the problems of the elderly poverty and minority  populations of the Rio Grande Valley. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
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